I am interested in spearheading the development of a module that allows the creation of quizzes, administers them and keeps records of users' performance. This module would be aimed at educational sites where users come to test thier skills and understanding. I would like initial feedback from the community to guage interest and to find out if anybody has already begun work in this direction.

As I see it, a quiz is a series of questions on a topic. A question is a presentation and an interaction. I leave the definition of question this general to support the widest variety of possible formats. The most obvious kind is multiple choice where the presentation is a 'question' and there are several 'answers' to choose from, one or more of them being right. Choosing the right answer is the interaction. Another format could be a spelling quiz where the presentation is an mp3 or wav of a word and the interaction is the user typing the spelling. There are endless variants and all should be supported.

The quiz module should support the notion of 'quiz owner' and 'quiz taker' as roles. Quiz owners are the creators and/or administrators of quizzes, whereas quiz takers must have only the permissions necessary to take quizzes.

Questions should be community contributed, thus the revision and moderation processes will be key. The module must support comfortable revisions so that spelling mistakes and adjustments to the wording of questions can be improved through time by non-tech users. Moderation must guarantee that better questions get more limelight than inferior questions.

This module could be used on several types of sites with several intended audiences. Its clear and primary use would be with schools and learning institutions of all natures. It could also function as a screening mechanism for job applicants, or as a certification training aid, or as a game platform.

Please elaborate the list of requirements and use-cases so that I can draw upon the widest range of ideas while planning this.

Thanks!

Comments

Boris Mann’s picture

Funny, I was just talking about this yesterday with Will Pate of GoodBasic -- he's trying to get together educators to look at Drupal as an alternative to current online learning systems.

We had briefly talked through the creation of a "quizzes" module. The survey module is OK for short surveys, but it's meant for anonymous use and has some other shortcomings, and really the needs of quizzes is different enough to warrant a separate module. But, the forms module could likely be re-used as a supporting module.

An additional permission would be "quiz marker" (imagine the TA of a professor marking). We had imagined that along with the quiz itself, the "answer template" would be created. There would be some questions (e.g. multiple choice) that would have just one answer and could be marked automatically, but text-answer questions would have, on the answer side, a "model" answer as well as a list of points to guide the quiz marker. Scores could be entered, as well as comments on rightness/wrongness.

The quiz taker could view their own results. The answer template could be made public after the fact.

For a set of quizzes, stats/reports could be generated on marking/grades. Export to Excel, SPSS.

Some of your thoughts seem to be around an almost "question bank" type system. In which case, you would actually have a "quiz" node, as well as "question" nodes. Again, see survey/forms for similar interaction, except that "questions" would exist on their own.

Like the profile module (or book pages?), you might want to have labelled quiz sections.

OK, that's all I can remember for now. Will will chime in, and perhaps point some other education types here.

Robert Paterson’s picture

Hi My name is Rob Paterson and I teach a number of online courses at UPEI. Will Pate and Jarrod Piccioni have been developing a Drupal site for me over the last year. We are now in version 3 Beta - I would ay that we are with 20% of a release value.

I have been teaching online now for more than 4 years and think that I am beginning to get it. Please bear with me but I felt compelled to offer some context in the midst of this conversation about a feature.

I am in my mid 50's and grew up utterly imbued with the teacher/student set up that we all know. The teacher is the sage on the stage and imparts the wisdom to her students. The curriculum is clearly bounded and can be therefore tested. It is the job of the student to learn the stuff in this bounded curriculum and to be able to repeat it back to the teacher. The teacher will then reward this with marks. The rewards are extrinsic and are in the control as is everything of the teacher. Sounds familiar?

Most online tools tray their best to replicate this set of assumptions in the tool. With the greatest respect, knowing that we are all prisoners of the prevailing culture and pedagogy, I know that tools that replicate this approach will fail.

The history of innovation is one of a lag in culture behind the effective deployment of a new tool. A few examples. In 1940, the French had more and better tanks than the Germans. But the French were defeated in weeks. What happened? Why did the French who had the advantage with more and better of the new fail and so badly? Because they used the tank in the context of it being a mobile pillbox or infantry support (the problem of the previous war) while the Germans used a new context of the tank as a strategic assault weapon. Those that used the PC as a small mainframe, missed its true power as a connective tool (Even Bill missed this for a while) Those that saw its role as a connector did best.

The power of online learning is not only the obvious that it breaks the barriers of time and place. It is that it changes the relationship between all parties. Learning is now derived not from the explicit - what can be written down in a book - but is better derived from the tacit - which is derived from the inner recesses of knowledge (The Gold) This can only happen in conversation and only in a conversation that is safe. The tacit is also intrinsically motivated which means that the learning sticks. How much of what you learned for a test remains? How much of what you learned for your self do you still have? Such a new way demands a very different relationship with the teacher. Tests have little place in a learning community. Imagine that I am a programmer in a Drupal community such as this. Where does a quiz fit? If I don't know something I ask the community for help. Sometimes no one person has the answer but a conversation between a few will extract it.

If you think of the tool only in terms of a set of features embedded in how we have always done this, then Drupal will end up like WebCT. This site in a real learning community. We don't know how to do all this stuff so we are talking about it. We are having a conversation.

The easiest metaphor for the bottom line utility of Drupal for learning that I can think of is eBay. eBay have above all created a SAFE PLACE where people can trade directly. Think how different this is from a store! This is the scale of the cultural gulf that we have to consider. The learning tool that will take over the world will be one that whose utility creates a safe conversation between a group of learners facilitated by the prof/facilitator whatever. sometimes you don't need a facilitator.

This safe place can be bounded by a course with a set of learning limits (I would be happy to show you what Will and I are up to at UPEI) and also will be unbounded places where say people with a common problem such as diabetes will learn from each other how best to mediate their symptoms, their treatment and their health. It will be a place where say oncologists keep current and help each other. Some have said that a conversation will not work with a set and known area such as a book or math. I disagree. If the book is say Tale of Two Cities there is no better way of understanding and getting to love the book than by sharing experiences of reading it. All math problems were new and mysterious to those that first solved them. They are presented today as givens. Well they are not and if they have a context and conversation then they become as mysterious and wonderful as they really are.

Underneath all of this is a new approach to design. We have been gripped by the machine model. All design is to a tangible goal. In nature all design is about how supporting processes interact and produce a dynamic called life. The old learning works to a goal called a mark or a credential. The new opens the student to her own mind: to a community who stimulates her and in the end to the realization that learning is not something separate from the other activities in her life but is central to her existence.

Sorry this is a lecture and an interruption. I make it because I am finding Drupal close to being the type of life giving tool that I know will be the winner. I make it because I feel in the community, a need for such a tool and the energy to move forward very quickly.

So we are, as always, at choice. We can stay with the old way of seeing the world or we can see the potential of Drupal to change it

Rob Paterson

Rob Paterson

robertDouglass’s picture

It is my hope that by taking an old form and adding a couple of new dimensions to it we will come up with a tool that visionaries such as yourself will be able to incorporate into "safe place" teaching strategies. If you think of the quiz module as one part of a site that covers, say books, with book reviews, forums, contributed essays and analysis as the other parts, I think you start to approach an environment where genuine online learning can happen.

Please do show or describe to us your work at UPEI. If we can generate any synergies through our efforts we'd both be better off for it.

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

Will Pate’s picture

Hi Robert, it's really cool to see other people in the Drupal community coming up with the same ideas that we do.

Community contributed questions may raise more problems than it solves. Allow me to play devil's advocate for a moment, some questions come to mind: Will instructors want students contributing questions in the first place (I've yet to see an instructor invite even the most intelligent students to contribute questions to a test, maybe it's practiced in some places) If students are contributing questions, will they be apt to suggest low hanging fruit? Will this create a situation where instructors are skeptical of these questions and ignore most of them anyway? Will instructors feel pressure from the class to include their questions even if they aren't of the highest calibre? Could this become a source of tension between them? Does the presence of any of these possibilites mean that it no longer is of more utility than a student simlpy emailing an instructor their suggestion in private?

I agree with Boris, there would be a necessity (especially for post-secondary institutions) to allow a third group of user, the teacher's apprentice, to mark the results on the instructor's behalf. Otherwise you may have professors thinking it's best to give their login information to the TA, under the assumption that the they wouldn't do anything they shouldn't with the access - not the most solid security presumption. But wouldn't this only be necessary for non-multiple choice questions? Could it not check the multiple choice answers given automatically against the correct ones and generate a mark?

The rest of Boris' thoughts expand on what we discussed a few days ago. I think most of making this really useful for the instructors and students will be ironing out the details of how the marking, recordkeeping and access of records by students will work.

These are just my early thoughts and it's my first time contributing to a module development discussion, so I might be missing or just plain wrong on something. I'll keep an eye on htis conversation and stay in the conversation as it hopefully grows. :)

Will Pate | Digital Strategist
Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery Labs (GFDRR Labs)
The World Bank

robertDouglass’s picture

Hi Will,

Thanks for taking the time to respond!

First of all, the idea of community contributed questions assumes a segregation of roles, teachers vs students. The contributed questions are to enable a group of teachers to share questions amongst themselves. I had never conceived of the scenerio where students submit questions, though with Drupal permissions, this could be arranged. As a further note, the community driven question-bank would only be one configuration option - the module could just as easily be used to aid teachers making quizzes for their students and not sharing the questions with anyone else. It is only a matter of configuration (user permissions).

I had not forseen the need of a teaching assistant role, as I had initially focused on the type of question where automatic proofing is possible (eg spelling, multiple choice, matching). In my (soon to be released) technical spec on the matter, it will be clear that a mechanism for providing feedback to the quiz-takers has been considered.

I want to be able to support sites where quiz-takers finish the quiz and get immediate feedback as well as sites where a group of quiz-takers must finish the quiz (or a deadline be reached) before the feedback (right answers) are available.

Hope this helps bring my intentions into focus.

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

robertDouglass’s picture

Check out http://drupal.org/node/4084 and http://www.trackersden.com/node.php?id=306 for a demo.

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

gilcot’s picture

it's java based...
bad point according to me...

please, look http://www.lucagalli.net/ (QuizzFaber) and http://chrono.apinc.org/index.php (chrono-form)
[the bad point is the need of JavaScript]

cel4145’s picture

This is a great idea and much needed by many people in education. That being said, I'm a writing teacher and we don't do quizzes, so my suggestions are probably going to be less useful than I wish they could be :)

First, add in the ability to associate a node with a question, so that questions are displayed one by one with the node preceding it on the same page. This would facilitate training programs, where the user can be asked to read through some information, and the module could either

a) require an answer before moving on to the next question
b) require the correct answer before moving on to the next question (if multiple choice is used)

Second, in LMS's, effective quiz modules are typically well-integrated with robust grading modules for tracking and maintaining student grades. So break storage of quiz results into a separate grading module which has enough flexibility in structure and code design that it will encourage others to develop it (assuming you don't want to get into that).

Last, the community submitted and moderated questions idea certainly has sounds exciting for a student-enabled learning environment. I'm not sure exactly how it would work pedagogically, but I think some teachers might experiment and find some interesting ways to make use of it.

If I think of anything else, I'll come back and add in some more ideas :)

robertDouglass’s picture

I hadn't considered the training program use-case, but what I've got in mind will clearly be well suited for it.

I'm planning on storing the results of each quiz taken in a table so that any variety of grading modules can be written. As a default feature quiz-takers will be able to access their entire history and see what questions they got right/wrong and what the correct answers would have been. The exact nature of this result access will be influenced by the quiz creator to support use-cases where the instructor needs to delay access to quiz results until a certain point in time.

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

cel4145’s picture

This may be more than you want right now, but given multiple sets of quizes, I would create a basic grading module that lists the total score for each quiz. Clicking on the quiz there would take the user to the results for each question for an individual quiz. Then the grading module would need a display table (sort of like the tracker hit displays) for all users in a given role and by user for the administrator, and access by the individual user to their grades. I use the tracker hit display as the example, because the sorting process available with it by clicking on the heading titles would be most useful. The teacher could click a name heading to sort by users, click on a quiz title heading to sort the table numerically by that grade (click one way for ascending, another for descending).

The quiz score/grading display table should also include a total column, where it adds the scores for all quizzes.

With this in mind, it would also be useful to have a scale for the quiz result grades, a number of points assigned to each question by the administrator teacher. That way, a teacher can easily setup a quiz to scale to 100 points or whatever point value they want the quiz as a whole to go to. This leads well toward a grading module that can add up points in the main display tabel.

The main display table of scores for all users would be the one to export to excel format for downloading. Then someone else can come along and expand the grading module to allow for input of additional grades. That's all you need to have an effective grading module :)

robertDouglass’s picture

I'll consider the feasibilty of the other points as well. A more detailed specification is being prepared and colleagues of mine are reviewing it now. I'll post here when it is ready. Keep the suggestions coming!

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

bleckb’s picture

Like Charlie, I teach a lot of writing, but I also teach literature courses, so I could use a quiz feature. I've used both blackboard and webct in the past, and the use of quizzes allows me to require that students demonsrtate they have read all of the assignments. Since one of the first steps of most of my assignments is to do some reading, I like to find a way to make sure that happens. On the flip side, not having a quiz while teaching an online lit class with drupal, I've just had students write about each reading rather than answer quesitons about them. So, as for need, I can go both ways.

One thing I think would be good, and I don't think I read any suggestions on this so far, is a timing option, where students have x number of minutes or hours to get a test or quiz taken. A start and stop time seems a good feature as well so people can put the quiz together and let it start at a designated time without having to sit down and turn it on or off manually. The ability to allow retakes, or not, is a choice offered by webct and blackboard so that would probably be another thing to include.

One thing that both webct and blackboard do is pull quizzes from larger test banks. So you might have 1000 questions, and the quiz funciton pulls out a designated number, and it may also present them in randomized order to cut down on cheating. These are a couple of things I think would be necessary to help drupal compete with the big boys.

Bradley
Spokane Falls CC
Spokane, WA
http://bleckblog.org

bradley || bleckblog.org

cel4145’s picture

I could imagine a quiz bank made up of questions organized by taxonomy. The quizzes would be made up of quiz pages. A quiz page would contain quiz questions selected from the quiz bank that could be proceded by the title and body of a Drupal node (book module nav structure would be omitted). This would allow for training programs or learning module assembled coursework. Then to implement Robert's moderation, a user-rated quiz would contain one or more quiz pages, with each quiz page containing the top rated quiz questions based on one or more taxonomy terms (and, of course, a node title and body if selected by the quiz creator). Both user-rated and normal quizzes could optionally offer a rating/voting system beside each question.

That's really robust if you include the timing mechanisms, paging configs (i.e, user must answer questions to continue to next page, user must answer questions correctly to continue, user can go back and forth through quiz), and the option to allow users to take only once or more than once.

robertDouglass’s picture

I'll incorporate the quiz open parameters into the spec. I'd thought of timed quizzes, but not having a quiz open and close.

I will also add a field where the quiz administrator can determine whether the quiz can be retaken and if so, how many times.

I intend to offer the quizbank features offered above, and more. A teacher can hand filter questions or let them be randomly picked.

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

Will Pate’s picture

Hi Robert,

Happy to participate but hope you put my suggestions (they are as a vendor) behind those of the actual instructors. I just try to be a filter for the best ones :)

Yes, a question bank would have much greater utility than what I misread about student contributed questions. It's easy to forsee instructors putting their question sets in once and reusing them the next time they teach the same course.

I still concerned that student contributed questions would be best as an option, at the most. Although Charlie (cel4145) may find it exciting, I'm hesitant to add features that we're not sure instructors want or need, especially if there is no positively received precedent for them in other elearning tools. It just seems to theoretical for my tastes.

Charlie's recommendation of having the option to require an answer before moving on to the next question is bang on, especially in the corporate training setting.

It's good to see that the grading and recordkeeping is being seriously considered, as it will be crucial. My only concern is that it stays very simple for both instructor and student, with assigning of different mark values for questions a capability but not obtrusive if they are all to be set at 1, for instance. Good defaults will make it work.

I'm not sure what to say about time limits on tests, perhaps some more instructors could weight in on this?

The ability to set a retake as number would be good, but that would have to be only allowable before the correct answers are viewed. Will allowing the correct answers to be viewed be just a checkbox for yes or no?

It sounds like this is really coming together well, the conversation has been great. I look foward to seeing your technical spec!

Will Pate | Digital Strategist
Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery Labs (GFDRR Labs)
The World Bank

Boris Mann’s picture

The questions-as-nodes is similar to many other X-as-nodes discussions. While I see that there are many things you *coud* do with a question as a node....making it not a node might be easier, similar to how form fields are added to a survey node.

But, that's depending on what the end goal is. Perhaps an extended (or add on to) survey module might fit what I'm thinking about, and many of the other things you are talking about would be better/only done with questions as true standalone nodes.

Rob -- have you tested survey/forms? Any feedback?

hjarche’s picture

When I worked for an LCMS development company, the quiz/test function was the one that each and every client needed to change. I would suggest keeping tests as simple and as robust as possible, but based on sound principles. For instance, all test questions should exhibit both "validity" and "reliability". Can these requirements somehow be put into a quiz module so that people actually check for validity & reliability before submitting students to a test?

I would be willing to work with anyone who is developing a quiz module, by looking at the best practices in test construction, and making some design recommendations. Let's have Drupal set the standard for good test construction, which has been missing from most LMS/LCMS/CMS/VLE etc.

Harold

Barbara Schroeder’s picture

Wow, that would certainly add a lot to a quiz module and encourage more research to take place, since test questions could automatically undergo reliability tests. There are many opportunities for research with drupal, especially in education. Do students communicate more with drupal? Does drupal decrease the transactional distance in online courses better than the traditional course management systems, such as Blackboard? Do students feel more involved in a drupal-powered course? Does the drupal interface create a more collaborative learning environment? I even envision a future online classroom where students can edit course materials, creating their own customized course. Pretty radical stuff for many educators.
Barbara

Barbara

robertDouglass’s picture

Hi Boris,

the main rationale for having questions as nodes is that some users of the system will be most interested in the questions. They will want to spend long sessions creating, reviewing and revising questions with little or no regard to which quizzes the questions might appear in. It is also the questions that need to be exportable (XML, CSV etc). The fact that questions are the permanent part of the system and quizzes the temporal and dynamic part necessitates node status for them, in my opinion. If for no other reason, questions should be nodes so that they can take advantage of the revisions system. It would be possible to avoid creating nodes for quizzes, I think, but I have to investigate the benefits of this.

The survey module has real potential to be the engine that drives quizzes. I have to look at it more closely (at the db level) and see what issues there might be. I've definitely installed and tested the two modules and find them to be very fine work indeed. In light of my feeling that questions need to be nodes, we may run into problems, but I haven't looked into the database layer issues for the survey module that closely yet, so I don't know. Thanks for pointing out the potential, though; I'm always in favor of building things modularly.

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

cel4145’s picture

If I can jump in here with a suggestion:

The advantages of using the node system are well taken, Robert, and ultimately, the use of nodes makes a lot of sense. But many educators will probably want to control access so that only the quiz taker can see the questions when the teacher wants them to. They might never be made public on the site for teachers reuse questions. For this reason and more, in education, security is paramount in terms of grades, quizzes and the quiz questions. In fact, if the quiz grades or scores were ever accidentally made public on the Internet, it would be a violation of US Federal law and could result in lawsuits. Storing questions--all quiz and grade functions--in separate tables outside of the node system will likely be seen as more secure to many educational institutions and make Drupal an easier sell to potential converts.

I also suspect that managing the permissions via keeping all quiz information out of the node systems, instead of using one of the existing node permission modules, may simply be much easier for you to implement effectively at this time. You've got some fancy access control coding to do if you take all these suggestions ;-)

robertDouglass’s picture

Whether questions extend nodes or not is not a factor in security/permissions. In fact, Drupal's permissions system, which is rather nicely developed, is based on the idea that a new type extends a node. Furthermore, Drupal has node-level access control which can only be activated for nodes. Without this I won't be able to make quizzes or questions only available to certain groups of users. The very best way to guarantee that only the right people at the right times see nodes or quizzes is to have them both be node types, imo.

As for storing quiz results in a separate database table, this is a given. Making a new node type doesn't mean expanding the node table itself, but rather making another table, like {question} and linking them through the node id.

Security and permissions is an important topic and I appreciate all discussion that comes my way on the issue. Particuarly the various use-cases that might be useful (such as a quiz that can't be seen before a certain date/time or after a certain date/time, or only to a certain user-role).

cheers,

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

cel4145’s picture

Drupal's permission system is also fairly new. I like what I have seen, but from my brief experimentation with the various node access control modules, they may need a version or two to mature in terms of usability and configuration options. Here are a couple of specific complications I can think of:

1) one node access control system (node by roles) might work well for the quiz modules, but taxonomy_access might be more suitable for the rest of the site needs of the administrator (for example, taxonomy_access works well for forums). How well do these work together? Can they? How efficiently does Drupal run if more than one access control system is running? If the node by roles module adds significant overhead to the sites efficiency but it not used for anything but quizzes, would it be more efficient to have the access checks in the modules itself without using nodes?

2) I haven't had a chance to really use the nodes by role access controls (have been working with taxonomy_access), but will you be able to lock out an individual user from accessing a quiz once the quiz is taken using this module even though his/her role still has access? I suspect that you'll have to hard code in the module that rather than being able to make use of the nodes by role module. Then there's the reverse. A student misses a quiz and the teacher decides to let them make it up. The module might have to allow access to a quiz by user even though their role is no longer able to. Or the teacher might have an entirely new makeup quiz to give only to that student.

"Without this I won't be able to make quizzes or questions only available to certain groups of users."

As far as (2) above, you are still going to have do some access control in the module itself. If quizzes are available outside of nodes, you should be able to hard code a role check, too.

robertDouglass’s picture

I plan to address all access concerns in the module itself based on the use-cases that are to be supported, and not depend on any outside module. That said, it would be best if someone could turn on taxonomy_access, for example, and customize the module further without breaking it. I'll spend some more time thinking about this and add more detail to the specification (still not ready, will take some time still).

As for performance, the costs are there, but that can't go away; any system that checks user rights on a node-level will have to do extra queries against a table where the rights for that node are stored, and since Drupal does this just fine, I won't try to reinvent it, but rather to just use it wisely.

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

Boris Mann’s picture

Good -- just wanted to make sure you were eying surveys/forms.

I think, potentially, that there could be several ways to go with this. We want to extend survey a bit to handle 80-90% of the standalone/for-pay survey systems out there. This would be forms-based questions, and may work well for simple quizzes.

For those simple quizzes, a "quiz" module could tie into either forms-based/non-node questions, OR, be a container for "quizquestions". And actually, "quizquestions" might be something that could lend themselves for building a faq.module or knowledgebase.module as well.

Of course, this is me going off in a couple of different directions :P Need to do some exploratory code, first.

Robert, we have been thinking along similar lines to your "bounty" system, and will be glad to help support. The main thing I'd like to do is tie specific requirements/functionality to "levels" of bounty -- need to make sure that developers can put good quality time into this.

We can offer dedicated development space, including trouble-ticketing and SVN repository -- final release would of course be here on Drupal.org.

I think Will is running around trying to gather some of these disparate threads under something like a "DrupalED" banner (Charlie, I think this is what you called your bundle?). So, be sure to look for his postings in this regard.

robertDouglass’s picture

Boris,

I'll take you up on your offer to host the development environment as it is probably more complete than the setup Webs4 can offer at this time. I'm going to push to have the first draft of my spec ready this week and the first code ready within 2 weeks. It will be easier to get people on board when there is already some code to be seen. This means that I'll be ready to take advantage of your hosting offers in something like 10 days.

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

robertDouglass’s picture

I have an initial draft of the specification ready. Please read it and make your comments on the Webs4 site. Things will move quickly at this point, and I hope to start having code for review in circa two weeks.

The programming for this module is being funded by donations. I have a nice initial pledge of $500 from Webs4.com, and anybody interested in seeing this module come into being is encouraged to contribute whatever seems appropriate. I will be leading the project as a volunteer, and coding as a volunteer as well. The bulk of the programming will be done by hired programmers.

This is an experiment in pooling resources to get a job done, and while it is a very simple model, the success of failure of the effort will tell us a lot about how much potential there is in the pledge/bounty system for funding open source development.

Here's the link:
http://www.webs4.com/quiz_module

And the announcement here:
http://drupal.org/node/16063

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

Will Pate’s picture

Planning the development of a quiz module with an intended audience of elementary schools seems unnecessarily narrow. Considering the myriad of uses for a quiz module (elementary, high school, university, polytechnical and corporate training), I just can't understand the assumption that it will be most used by elementary schools.

The use of the phrase "community contributed" questions is misleading in the context of what community usually means in Drupal - everyone with an account. We've visited this issue before and you seem to intend that it's really a quiz bank in which instructors can share questions and save them for later. It would be clearer if the spec used explicit language in this respect.

Talking about video and audio is putting the cart before the horse. Focus on text, get that right, and then think about rich media.

There is no clear list of the type of questions that will be supported. May I suggest the following?

Calculable
1. True/False - Choose whether an answer provided is true or false. (Checkbox)
2. Multiple choice - Chose one answer from a list of possible choices. (Radio button)
3. Matching - Match a value in one column with a value in another column. (Radio buttons)

Non Calculable
4. Short answer - A short answer question is asked and a small textarea with a reasonable maximum number of words is provided to answer.
5. Long answer - An open ended question with a textarea with unlimited word max for a longer answer.

Non calculable questions would require later marking by an instructor or TA.

Proposed modified workflows:

1. Type question
2. Choose taxonomy
3. Choose type
a) True/False - Select whether answer is true/false (radio)
b) Multiple choice - Enter up to 4 possible answers. Select correct answer (radio). Click "Add more" to save current, display saved and new fields to add more possible answers.
c) Matching - Enter up to 4 each left and right column values. Select correct combination. Click "Add more" to save current, display saved and new fields to add more possible answers.
d) Short answer - Set maximum number of words per answer. Checkbox for "set as default" will set that as default number for short answer.

Setting the default question selection to random is not recommended. Random, from experience and common sense, does not make a good default. If randomness is a required possibility, it should be a checkbox that is unchecked by default. If the instructor selects the box, it displays the number of questions for the quiz and allows them to type in any number lower than that.

Shuffle is another poor default. Sure, leave it as an option but setting it as default doesn't make sense in many situations.

Question popularity score is of limited utility. Shelf it and focus on the core module functionality.

Will Pate | Digital Strategist
Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery Labs (GFDRR Labs)
The World Bank

robertDouglass’s picture

All of the question types you mentioned above will be supported. In the same way that books, blogs, polls, forums and images are all nodes in Drupal, multiple-choice, true-false, short answer etc. will all be questions (from an object-type point of view). My goal is to support contributed question types in the same way that flexinode supports contributed field types. More research and planning is needed in this area and any technical suggestions are welcome.

I'm sorry if I overemphasized the focus on elementary education in an earlier version of the specification and I have now removed all reference to elementary education. A simple and intuitive interface should be the goal no matter who the audience is. I don't forsee any inherent bias towards any particular level of education being built into the module, so your concerns here are being addressed.

All of the configuration options will be, well, configurable, including default behavior. I want to support cases where teachers or students can approach the system for their intended task and accomplish it with very few clicks (find a quiz, make a quiz, take a quiz), but also accomodate power users who need ultimate control (this mostly applies to quiz creation).

To really achieve the above goal, it won't be enough to build the module, one way or another. There will have to be a post-development effort to create products out of the module, similar to the way CivicSpaceLabs (www.civicspacelabs.org) has their distribution configured for different target groups.

The question popularity is, of course, a development priority for the second or third phase of implementation -core functionality comes first. It is, however, important for my vision of vast question banks where the topic "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" has 500+ contributed questions. Quiz makers with little time for reading that many questions will want to see which questions other teachers have favored.

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

clairem’s picture

Hi Robert, I have read the module description on your website, and it looks very impressive.

However, it reminded me about a quiz module I started and abandoned about six years ago (a standalone Perl job, docs now lost). I designed that with a different usage in mind, and I wondered whether you might feel like tweaking the design of your module to allow the possibility of this alternative usage.

My intended audience was not an educational one, but an interest group -- people who were interested in the subject matter of our website. Its purpose was not to grade anybody, but to allow them to test and expand both and their knowledge and their thinking, and to get pointers to more information on that field: more a matter of encourgaing learning than measuring knowledge.

Here's how I envisaged it:

  1. Answers were not stored. Instead, the "result" was given immediately
  2. There could be no "correct" answer (allowing for trick questions), or several correct responses (to demonstrate the existence of multiple truths in a field). Alternatively, each response would get a score.
  3. The score to each question was given immediately: the casual visitor to a website may not want to hang around and complete a whole quiz.
  4. The user's score was accompanied by an optional explanation of the scoring, explaining the issue to the user and allowing them do further reading on linked material.
  5. At any time, the user could say "enough", and get a summary of their score so far; or say "staart again" to rest the score.

Here's a trivial example of how a question might be set up:

  • Q. Which is the best open-source Content-Management System?
    a) Drupal; b) Frontpage; c) Mambo; d) Post-Nuke; e) I dunno
  • scoring: a) 4, b) 0, c) 3, d) 3, e) 5
  • Explanation:
    1. 0 points.
      Frontpage is not open-source, and it is not a Content-Management System (it's a proprietary webpage creation package)
    2. 4 points
      Drupal is a very good CMS. It's very robust, and produces clean, standards-compliant output
    3. 3 points
      Mambo is an easily-installed CMS, often chosen for broachure-type sites
    4. 3 points
      Post-Nuke is a well-tested and widely-used system, popular for its forums
    5. 5 points
      The best answer is "I don't know". A CMS should be selected for a particular purpose

    The choice of content-management system can provoke fierce debates, but most have strengths and weaknesses. You should compare and evaluate them to se which best suit your purposes.
    There is an excellent comparison matrix at http://www.cmsmatrix.org/

And another one:

  • Which is the best size for on-screen display of body text in a webpage?
    a) 8pt; b) 10pt; c) 12pt
  • scoring: a) 0, b) 0, c) 0
  • Explanation: Zero points for all answers. Web designers should not hard-code font sizes in webpages. Users set up their browsers to use a font size they like, and designers should use CSS to set a webpage's fonts relative to that size

This may sound like a bit of a diversion, but it seems to me to be something which would also be useful in educational settings.

robertDouglass’s picture

Hi clairem,

Almost all of your points are accounted for in the specification. The only one that I saw that hasn't been accounted for (with the current spec) is:

At any time, the user could say "enough", and get a summary of their score so far; or say "staart again" to rest the score

This isn't such a bad idea - I'll have to see if I can squeeze it into the first draft. Maybe I should go back to the specification and reword it so that these intentions are more clear.

If you like the module, and think you'll be able to use it, we're welcoming $ support as well. Obviously, what this thing looks like in the end will partly depend on how well funded it is.

cheers,

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net
or www.webs4.com

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

ec’s picture

Hello guys,
Ryan and I have post quite at the time a question about workflows, here http://drupal.org/node/16177 for Ryan and here http://drupal.org/node/16175 for me. But reading your specifications for revising and moderating questions found here http://www.webs4.com/node/28, I wonder if for that part were are not all asking for quite the same thing ?
Eric

robertDouglass’s picture

The biggest difference is that I'm looking at a moderation score, not a simple transition (publish). I'll get back to this issue after giving it more thought - thanks for pointing out the connection.

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net
or www.webs4.com

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

ec’s picture

Robert, thanks for answering me. Please have look here http://drupal.org/node/16175 at Jvandyck post. It sounds to me that if questions are nodes then it should benefit that you use his infrastructure, don't you ?
Regards,
Eric

robertDouglass’s picture

I'm a fan of the work that is going on with the action and workflow modules, and agree that they have the potential to not only address the quiz module's need for moderation, but also revolutionize the way Drupal programming is done (or at least lead to drastic restructuring). I'm still evaluating whether this is the very best way, or just one of the attractive options. Many things to consider.

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net
or www.webs4.com

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

ec’s picture

Robert, when you wrote [Permission "revise questions unmoderated" means that this user's revisions will replace the existing version and that this user can access the moderation queue and decide to approve queued revisions or not]. I'm looking for the exact same thing ! When a teacher write a question and fire it to the queue, it's a sort of transition from "draft" to "review", isn't it ?

By the way, it sounds to me that the peer review is a more general case of a hierarchical review. For example, if you have a role with only one user, if the threshold for publishing is set to "1" and that user can only give one "0" or "1", then you only need one vote and one user to publish or to go back.

So, maybe the biggest difference with the needs of quizz.module is to have ability to set up many steps to the workflow and for each one the threshold to fire up from one stage to an other and also to map with a role.

Regards,
Eric

robertDouglass’s picture

I promise to report back on this when I'm able to do some deep thinking on it. Thanks for your analysis - it would be great if the types of workflows we're both describing could be available to any node. Perhaps this project will be the catalyst?

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net
or www.webs4.com

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

javanaut’s picture

Since some sites have elaborate user profile information, it would be nice to use a quiz/survey interface during the signup process to populate profile data.

Just something I've considered in the past.

robertDouglass’s picture

The trick would be to use the survey.module to collect the information prior to registration and have the last survey page go to the registration screen. The difficulty would be binding the survey info (from anonymous) to the newly created user's profile info.

Another approach would be to have the profile info filled out after registration, use the survey, the last survey page triggers an action that updates the profile info in the user table.

This all has to do with the idea of linked pages (form 1 goes to form 2). In that respect there is similarity with the quiz module, but I think it ends there.

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net
or www.webs4.com

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

Gunnar Langemark@www.langemark.com’s picture

Take a brief look here: http://drupal.org/node/6505

We've discussed quizzes and questionnaires a few times before.

Now it looks like it will be christmas early this year. :-)

As far as I can see the proposal is well prepared to grow into something that will be usefull even to run existing e-learning content.
In learning management there are and have been some standard proposals for tracking and evaluation systems. But my advice would be to stay away from getting "sucked" into that maelstroem.

Very promising indeed!

Best
Gunnar

Dropping in from Langemarks Cafe.

Dropping in from Langemarks Cafe.

Steven’s picture

As a student at a large university, I can testify that most commercial educational solutions *cough*Blackboard*cough* are not all they're cracked up to be. Drupal can do almost everything they do already, and with much more elegance, simplicity and speed.

So I can only support this initiative with two very big thumbs up ;).

--
If you have a problem, please search before posting a question.

--
If you have a problem, please search before posting a question.

robertDouglass’s picture

In my discussions with several people it has come out that making quizzes isn't that revolutionary, and that there is lots of software[1] which does that already. What is exciting about the module is, like you said, the fact that it will work alongside all of the other feaures Drupal offers. It is in that context that quizzes can be a really valuable part of a larger self-learning environment.

- Robert Douglass

[1] http://www.webs4.com/node/32
-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net
or www.webs4.com

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

peteThomas’s picture

Having worked on courseware before, I agree on the Blackboard criticism - a proprietary and feature-poor system with the questionable saving grace of market penetration (moodle, segue being open competitors).

In terms of getting something stylish and user-friendly very quickly, have you thought of integrating Drupal with Hot Potatoes (http://web.uvic.ca/hrd/halfbaked/index.htm)?

HotPot's front-end is extremely easy for producing and locally testing javascript/HTML exercises (all the usual types are there -- multiple choice, cloze, matching, etc. ... the crossword creation tool certainly saves a lot of pencil/paper time). It is so agriculturally simple that even most teachers I've introduced it to managed to get up-and-running with it after just a couple of hours' training.

HotPot's files could easily be parsed and converted into something that Drupal could serve up and validate, with Drupal's role perhaps best integrated to manage uploads/conversions, supply course navigation/groupware, manage class sessions and registration, serve up exercises and compile results. Certainly, the HotPot guys have been working on their commendable project for several years -- why re-invent the wheel?

Other ideas for courseware:

For essays or expository prose, integration of an anti-collusion check...
http://plagiarism.phys.virginia.edu/

Enhancement of glossary module to provide glosses of common student spelling/punctuation errors... see Glossmaker:
http://makers.cet.middlebury.edu/makers/index.htm

robertDouglass’s picture

That would, of course, fall outside of the scope of the quiz module.

As for integrating with Hot Potatoes, the best we can do is learn from them and do at least as well as they did in terms of being easy to use. While integrating with a Java system is certainly not technically impossible, it is not something that can be considered as it would make installing the module extraordinarily difficult and we wouldn't reach a wide audience.

There's plenty of work to be done on the quiz module before the first pre-alpha-proof-of-concept version is ready. The most difficult decisions involve architecure and whether or not to depend on modules like the forms.module. If this phase goes well, though, there will come a time when new features and related modules will be easy to create.

- Robert Douglass

-----
www.robshouse.net
www.webs4.com

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

robertDouglass’s picture

Any of that stuff[1] would be possible for this module and for Drupal. Adding financial support to the project [2] will have a direct impact on how nice the bells and whistles turn out.

Thanks for the links.

- Robert Douglass

[1] http://makers.cet.middlebury.edu/makers/index.htm
[2] http://www.webs4.com/quiz_module
-----
www.robshouse.net
www.webs4.com

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

peteThomas’s picture

I agree that funding is the key issue in terms of scoping the project. The EU's new eContentPlus initiative is perhaps a good place to begin... most of these projects began last month and there is a lot of money being spent on open environments: the Drupal community certainly deserves a slice. The 9m euro iClass project, based in Brussels, seems to have broad overlap, so why not invite Eric Meyvis to the Drupal conference?

http://www.cordis.lu/ist/directorate_e/telearn/econtentplus.htm

With hotpot, the best integration would not be to integrate the entire java creation interface, but to machine-read its results (these are text files with the hotpot questions/javascript and DHTML code/answers) and translate them to a format that could work with the quiz module. I am thinking here of usability... hotpot is something that teachers can locally create, test and adapt (with no server installation/connection issues). Drupal's role would come in at the publishing phase.

cel4145’s picture

Just be glad you are using Blackboard. Blackboard is bad; WebCT is awful. Why university HCI and distance ed programs aren't screaming their heads off about the UI problems in it, I have no idea.

Just be glad. 'Course, it's making it easy for me to get people to use Drupal instead :)

osmif’s picture

I would use this module, and I would be happy to contribute. I can code, test, and pitch in with ideas. I'll start with the latter:

- Multipage and/or branching quizzes.
- Save and reopen a partially finished quiz.
- Shuffle Questions / Shuffle answers.
- Integrate with image galleries, other multimedia.

These are all features that can be cound elsewhere, notably in Moodle, which is in other regards a less ideal framework for general purpose community sites.

Can Drupal modules be coded in OO fashion, so as to be subclassable? That would seem to be a good approach to a feature like this one, which by its nature, can't be a one-size-fits-all solution.

Thanks for suggesting this.

robertDouglass’s picture

I would be open to discussing branching and multipage quizzes, but this raises some architectural issues so I'll need people to address the details I've laid out in the specification directly. I could also use help in any way filling out the specification, defining milestones, modularizing the development etc. I'll get around to all of this myself, but any help speeds things up.

You'll definitely get a chance to help in the coding and testing too.

Thank you very much for the donation.

- Robert Douglass

-----
visit me at www.robshouse.net
or www.webs4.com

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

Carlos Miranda Levy’s picture

Just to let you know that I'm moving our virtual community of educators to Drupal.

Should be all set up this week, but it's already available at http://portal.educar.org or http://www.eaprender.org (they are the same thing).

We will continue to use Moodle for most actual educational activity (on-line training and support for courses, etc.) at http://www.eaprender.org/campus - but I'm planning to have all other activity moved to Drupal (collaborative projects, on-line discussions, activity and content sharing, strategy development, etc.)

If our community can be of any help, let me know, we are visited by thousands of teachers from all over Latin America everyday and we have about a hundred of highly motivated educators sharing ideas and collaborating on different projects on-line.

I will certainly share all we do with Drupal here and am willing to help and support others in the education field who may need any assistance or support. (I can provide hosting and installation free of charge for anyone who needs it).

------
Con paciencia y calma,
sube un burro a una palma

--
Carlos Miranda Levy
Civil Innovation Lab
NEVER HELP: engage, enable, empower and connect...
www.civ.do www.relief20.com www.socinfo.com
www.educar.org www.bibliotecasvirtuales.com
www.haitird.com www.civila.com

robertDouglass’s picture

I'm thrilled to see the amount of support that is pouring out for this idea. Moving to Drupal is a very good decision for your site, in my opinion, and you will be well situated to use the quiz.module when it is ready.

There will be a time when your teacher community could be very helpful in testing the product. In the meantime, it is a matter of hours in the day - there still don't seem to be enough of them!

- Robert Douglass

-----
www.robshouse.net
www.webs4.com

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

robertDouglass’s picture

Had a brainstorming session with Alan Evans last night about the mechanism for extensible question types. We considered issues such as whether a dependency on flexinode.module was a good idea and what hooks a question type needs to implement. The updated specification and some prototype code can be found here:

http://www.webs4.com/node/26#question_type_hooks

We decided that flexinode provides a very good model of how to build an extensible system through contributed includes (field types in the flexinode case). We were both a little nervous about building a direct dependency on that module, though, and decided to base our mechanism on flexinode, even borrow code from it, but not use it directly. We decided that after 40 - 50 hours of development, if we see that we are simply recreating flexinode, we can still switch to a direct dependency. This seemed less painful to us than having to untangle ourselves from the module at the same point if instead we realize that our needs are somehow different and flexinode isn't exactly the right thing.

cheers,

- Robert Douglass

-----
www.robshouse.net
www.webs4.com

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

Barbara Schroeder’s picture

I'm an educator and am now finally trying out drupal for two of my online classes. There are two features that would make drupal highly valued in my area--a quiz module and gradebook. Our university uses Blackboard exclusively and as you know, it is very expensive and very linear. However, it offers a quiz module and gradebook, along with a feature where assignments can be dropped into specific fields within the gradebook.

I also like your idea about having students able to participate in the construction of the quizzes--extending the collaborative framework of drupal. I envision software such as drupal leading the way in instructional innovation.

Barbara

Barbara

reeses’s picture

I skimmed most of the previous responses as they appear to have been based on little exposure to Blackboard or other online tools of that sort.

I agree, Blackboard is less than great. I say this having been a Blackboard consultant for as brief a period of time as I could manage. :-)

I will give a little architectural overview, as I recall it. Not the implementation, as that would frighten people, but regarding quizzes.

Quizzes, tests, etc., were all "Assessments". Assessments contained questions of various types that were drawn from pools. This enabled a different test for each student, while keeping things easily gradable. Pools could contain different types of questions -- essay, multiple choice, short answer, etc. Obviously, some lend themselves to automatic or machine-assisted grading more easily than others.

One of the interesting things about Blackboard were cartridges, which contained course material related to a topic or, more frequently, a textbook. Pearson Education, for example, created a large number of "courses" that were tied to specific editions of their college and university textbooks, and hosted Blackboard for educators -- all to drive sales, of course. :-)

The integration with the gradebook would be fantastic in Drupal. It already has the notion of modules and blocks, so it's not too far off of where Blackboard was when I was last involved with them (about three years ago). It would be straightforward to implement the rudiments of this in Drupal.

I'm in kind of a delicate area regarding BBBB and direct competition, but if you could give a description of how you use Blackboard with your students, it could serve as a nice requirements starting point for someone who is not legally encumbered.

robertDouglass’s picture

The quiz module exists and the fundamental framework is in place. It is not, however, ready for use. Perhaps Angela Byron could comment on its state and what would be needed to get it up to speed? That way an organization looking to use it could gauge how much effort/time/money would be needed to finish the job. Now that a gradebook is on the way via Summer of Code 2006, Drupal is cruising toward being a premiere educational tool.

- Robert Douglass

-----
My Drupal book: Building Online Communities with Drupal, phpBB and WordPress

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

Acert93’s picture

This project seems very exciting. Please keep us posted :)

Personally, I am interested in a simple 'flashcard' module for quizing. Very simple word/answer with user response of right/wrong (wrongs get put back in the "deck"). The goal would be for Biblical Hebrew and Greek and based on frequency. I have the flashcards in a small javascript app now, but I would prefer to move them to Drupal :)

Alex Schenkman’s picture

Hi:

I'm curious about the status of the quiz module.
Is the module available anywhere?

Thanks!

robertDouglass’s picture

Nicholas Thompson is currently working on the module and has it nearly ready for use with 4.7. He'll commit the update when ready (asap).

- Robert Douglass

-----
My Drupal book: Building Online Communities with Drupal, phpBB and WordPress

my Drupal book | Twitter | Director, Product Operations Commerce Guys

seanbfuller’s picture

Any word on how this is going? I've got a project that the quiz module might be a candidate for, and I'd be willing to contribute patches.

--------------------
Sean B. Fuller
www.seanbfuller.com
www.tractiv.com

--------------------
Sean B. Fuller
www.seanbfuller.com

Acert93’s picture

I am excited about an update as well! I would greatly enjoy a Multiple Choice Q&A and Flashcard style module that could track user progress. Please keep us posted :D

dshafer’s picture

I'm getting ready to launch a business based on providing learning and discussion opportunities for adults. I've been a Drupal user for about a year now and I'm inclined to stay with it but I'm a better Python coder than a PHP scripter so I've been poking around in the Python world. Plone, a CMS framework built on top of Zope, has modules that support the development and deployment of open coureware (http://ocw.mit.edu) content. I haven't looked at the OCW stuff at all yet but since I noticed that this thread had attracted the attention of a number of educators who are to one degree or another knowledgeable about Drupal and about competitive products, I wonder if anyone has any observations on that approach being used by MIT and Stanford, among others.

My learning model is based more on the concept of interactive sharing, reading, writing and conversation than it is on formal assessment tools, though I'm sure I'll find many uses for the latter.

Any thoughts or opinions out there? Is Drupal as likely to be a great platform for this kind of activity as Plone?

FabriceV’s picture

You should visit DrupalEd.
http://www.drupaled.org/

and test elearning LMS
http://www.opensourcecms.com/index.php

My overall opinion is negative but depend on what you want to do... Thus, Drupal is probably a good CMS for a learning discussion site (blog, forum, comment...). Drupal is currently weak compare to LMS or Plone. It is both a problem of lacking modules and a problem of interface organisation. I recommend to you to also test Dokeos or Claroline. These LMS are clearly structured (more than moodle). You can separe your opened - general - presentation and learning site (Drupal) than your specific topic learning areas (Dokeos), or just use the sole Plone.
Sincerely

cel4145’s picture

I've had an excellent experience using Drupal for a "learning model based more on the concept of interactive sharing, reading, writing and conversation." I've also trained numerous other writing teachers on using Drupal with response overwhelmingly in the positive. Here's a co-presentation I did over a year ago which lays out some of the reasons we liked Drupal (the presentation is written for a more general audience, so it also talks about the virtues of open source).

Now it's been a while since I used Plone, so I can't talk about specific features. But if I had to define the difference between the two, I have always felt that Plone has a stronger document management oritentation--it's more about how content is served to the user--whereas Drupal is more about community/user interaction. Drupal's strong points are partially due to it's node architecture structure and this can enhance the pedagogical design of the course *if* the your interest is on interactivity and discussion and not course administration and content delivery. For instance, our distance ed courses at Purdue University Professional Writing use student individual blogs as the main space for student submission of content. Student group work is submitted as stories to the home page, and personal blog entries are promoted to the course home page as the subject of full class discussion. In addition, the book module has been invaluable for building and presenting course content. For an example, see my recent distance ed business writing class.

This year, I look forward to experimenting with OG now that the module has matured and have high hopes for using the liquid wiki engine in the future.

So, if you are interested in more traditional LMS features, I'd agree with the other commenter here and say look at Plone. But given your emphasis, I'd stick with Drupal or investigate Elgg. Meanwhile, if you are interested in active development of more traditional LMS features see the Google Summer of Code 2006 Assignment/ Gradebook suite. Bill Fitzgerald is actively mentoring this project, and as far as I can tell, he's the most active developing Drupal for elearning in the Drupal community right now.

-----
Charlie Lowe | cyberdash
Tips for posting to the Drupal forums

brakai295’s picture

hi,

i'm after a quiz-type module but don't want to read through all the content on this page.

As a quiz-type module available now or not?

Kai

Webdesign Melbourne Australia - www.brizk.com
Work Travel Australien - www.ausmag.de

seanbfuller’s picture

A lot of work has recently been done on the cvs version (4.7 compatible). There are still some things that need to be wrapped up, but it's come along way since then. See the list of current issues here:

http://drupal.org/project/issues/quiz

--------------------
Sean B. Fuller
www.seanbfuller.com
www.tractiv.com

--------------------
Sean B. Fuller
www.seanbfuller.com

goose2000’s picture

I'm trying it out now and may use it for a simple Pre / Post quiz. My one issue is that I can not seem to use PHP in the description, passed results, default results text.

Would that be possible? I need to evaluated the out come and provide new links. Also evaluate if a quiz has been completed, and if so give a link to new material hosted elsewhere.

Any thoughts?

John

zwu_ca’s picture

I recently set up http://www.mathpotd.org (Math Problem of the Day) and It looks I may borrow some code from quiz module. I already have a working module that uses Xajax.module. Does any one have a live demo of the quiz module?

goose2000’s picture

Sorry no. But yours looks like it is underway nicley. Anyone with ideas about 'input format' set to PHP is not working in quiz module, much apreciated.

John

seanbfuller’s picture

I've answered the issue you posted and I wanted to answer here as well. Quiz still has some holes that need patching up, although it does seem to be working now. Unfortunately, this is one of those holes.

As far as evaluating outcomes, however, have you played around with the pass/fail and summary options?

--------------------
Sean B. Fuller
www.seanbfuller.com
www.tractiv.com

--------------------
Sean B. Fuller
www.seanbfuller.com

goose2000’s picture

Hey Sean, any hope we will have quiz module in 5.0 drupal?
I think it is really worth the time to move it up. Wish I could help some?
Testing?

John A

elf_cash’s picture

You can see a live demo here: http://www.aceyourexitexam.com/content/practice-exam . This combines the 1.x branch of the quiz module for D5 with the filtering power of Drutex; a killer combo.

JBack’s picture

Hello all, I have recently started programming a module that will hopefully provide an xml document for a quiz show front end that was constructed in flash. I have just started learning my way around Drupal, and what I have seen so far I like.

How I am approaching it is having the questions be contained within a question set (basically a container with header information such as title, author, date of creation, number of easy questions, number of hard questions) within each one of these question sets is a easy and hard container that holds questions within them. My questions are structured with a question text, answer a, answer b, answer c, and an explanation text and of course the correct answer.

Users will have the ability to edit, create, and delete question sets (the header), plus have the ability to "drill down" into the question set and edit. create, and delete questions from within the sets.

Then I have to write the XML parser.

This project is just getting rolling, but I saw your post here about the quiz module and I thought I should post about what I am working on to see if we can come together on some parts of it, or possibly use some of your existing code to get me further along. Feel free to give me any feedback on the module I am working on, or any tips on how I should approach this project in Drupal. I would be more than willing to provide any help that I can. Nice work all!

gururug’s picture

Howdy Y'all,

What is the current state of development for this module?

I would like to contribute. I need seperate classes, weighting on questions, insert image for questions etc. etc. etc.

Are there modules that allready provide these? Otherwise I am happy to contribute code and / or ideas.

Cheers,

wulfman

kscheirer’s picture

I'm not sure what the status of the discussion is here,
but I thought it was worth linking to the 1.0 release
of the Quiz module, compatible with drupal 5.x

--
AchieveInternet

http://www.achieveinternet.com

----
Top Shelf Modules - Enterprise modules from the community for the community.

holydrupal’s picture

This module is great, I didn't think a quiz module exist in Drupal module list!!
Thanks a lot for this module.

dorien’s picture

What about adding a point system to the quiz module, where a user that answers a quiz correct (100% or a specified %) gets points.
Depending on how many points a user has, we could then accredit him different roles e.g. open the next level quiz to him.

----------------
drupalfun.com

renemar’s picture

the quiz is great. its very challenging.

------------------------
I challenge you to a game of trivia! Click here to battle against me online at ConQUIZtador. Let's see who's the winner...
https://www.conquiztador.com/?a=26041

I challenge you to a game of trivia! Click here to battle against me online at ConQUIZtador. Let's see who's the winner...
https://www.conquiztador.com/?a=26041

nabin213’s picture

I love quiz. How I can attend next quiz.....

nabin:)

sjmach’s picture

A simple fill in the blanks question could have alternative answer.
Eg:- Jesus Christ had ________ disciples.

Now there is only one answer 12. But users can write the same answer as 12 or twelve. Maybe adding something called alternative answer might solve this problem.

Thanks!!

thiruvelan’s picture

Is it possible to use quiz module to diabetes assessment as in http://www.diabetes.com/blood-sugar-control-matters/blood-sugar-control....

I want to implement similar assessment for diabetes, cholesterol, etc. If quiz is not the solution for my requirement then please advice the correct module and procedure.

Jaypan’s picture

Spammy!