Winner - Overall 2007 Open Source CMS Award

Packt Publishing has announced the overall winner of their 2007 Open Source CMS Award and it's Drupal! This first place award comes with a cash prize of $5,000, the highest of the cash prizes offered, which will be used by the Drupal Association to help the Drupal project flourish.

When asked about the award, Dries Buytaert (Drupal project founder) said, "The past year, we have worked hard to make Drupal more powerful and easier to use. It is great to see the Drupal community receive recognition for their hard work and dedication." Congratulations, team!

The forthcoming Drupal 6.x builds on the features recognized by this award, and offers a number of compelling improvements, including:

* Enhanced localization and i18n support
* Performance improvements and Improved Caching
* OpenID Client Support
* Task automation with Actions and Trigger system
* Many usability enhancements

As well as the first place overall finish, Drupal also finished second in the two other categories it was nominated in: Best Open Source Social Networking Content Management System and Best PHP Open Source Content Management System.

Congratulations go out to all the other finalists. The prize is an indication of excellence in software and fantastic community. Many thanks to Packt Publishing for generously supporting open source software.

Comments

ibnhafsun’s picture

Congrats to the community. Drupal is a great project and it is well deserved.

todosjuntos.org, Spanish Joomla! metacommunity
inmo-e.com, servicios inmobiliarios

joe-b’s picture

It's been building for a few years, but Drupal is now taking over the (open source CMS) universe!

Drupal - reaches the parts other open source content management systems cannot reach.

yaph’s picture

Hey that's great. Drupal and the community really deserve this award.

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ramiro.org

Walt Esquivel’s picture

I supported Drupal in last year's contest as well as this year and knew Drupal would do well.

Thanks to everyone that voted! Your vote made a difference.

Walt Esquivel, MBA; MA; President, Wellness Corps; Captain, USMC (Veteran)
$50 Hosting Discount Helps Projects Needing Financing

theborg’s picture

Go Drupal!!

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Your site will be assimilated. Resistance is futile

johsw’s picture

That's nice!

balasurfs’s picture

GO ! Go ! Go!

kipkoan’s picture

How can Drupal win the best overall open-source CMS... but Joomla wins the best PHP open-source CMS? They're both PHP. I'm confused.

greggles’s picture

The judging system, rules, and criteria are indeed a bit of a mystery to me.

Personally, I think all the systems that made the finals deserve praise, attention, and money (which they are all getting as a result of the award) and while the rankings and awards may not make complete sense to outsiders I think that we should just all smile and enjoy the attention being showered on Open Source in general.

--
Knaddisons Denver Life | mmm Chipotle Log

--
CARD.com :)

rosgar’s picture

the judges are also confused. Haha. Congratulations to Drupal beating Joomla this year!

Anyway, both of them are great. But the newcomer, CMS Made Simple make it to the top 3.

gdemet’s picture

They probably wanted to have as many different winners as possible so they could spread the award money around.

deanypop’s picture

by ruling that a single CMS could only win one category. Useless for those of us trying to decide/measure the actual merits... It would've been better to say "can only win ONE PRIZE", and then just assign the category prizes to the 2nd placers. Are you listening, Packt? Maybe next year you can make a truly "believeable" contest, that doesn't smack too much of weird cross-promotional hoo-hah to be relied upon by the masses.

But it does* get you (and Drupal) on digg. Which is good. Except for the whole upgrading-drupal-site-at-the-same-time-for-several-hours thing. :/

scanreg’s picture

This doesn't make sense to me since they're both php/mysql

Huh?

Rowanw’s picture

Category Award winners will be decided on a points basis. The CMS that the judges and public have voted as the number one will be awarded three points. The second placed CMS will receive two points and the third placed CMS will receive one point. The CMS with the highest number of points overall will be declared the winner

Drupal placed second in two categories, giving it 4 total points, while Joomla only earned 3 points for winning one category. The judges were also different for the overall winner.

AmyStephen’s picture

Congratulations to Drupal!!! This is an amazing community, one that pulls together, filled with contributors, rolling out one innovation after the other. Congratulations on this well deserved recognition! You are a source of continual inspiration! Enjoy the honor.

AmyStephen@gmail.com
http://OpenSourceCommunity.org

clo75’s picture

Glad to see that. In fact the Packt Publishing jury for the first times takes more care of the power and overall quality of CMS's and less on cosmetics and fancy graphics. So this is a good move as it's more an objective judgement than the previous years. But there are missing names in this contest : mostly Typo 3 and EzPublish

Drupal have most of the qualities required today for developing modern Web 2.0 websites and the own the best balance between power and... hum ease of use... yes (have you tried Typo 3 or EzPublish ?)

As there's still room for improvment, Drupal could win again in 2008 with Drupal 6 and in 2009 with Drupal 7... and so on ;-)

so congratulations Drupal and all the community... this is one of the best examples of Open Source

vph’s picture

I believe the success of Drupal stems from two important keys that others can learn from: proper documentation and modularity that allows flexible expansion of the core system.

ciperl’s picture

Now we know why Drupal didn't win the Best PHP Award.... Turns out Packt had in their rules that a CMS couldn't win more than one category. And since Drupal was given the top award, it was disqualified from winning the PHP category.

4. A CMS cannot win more than one category. For example the Overall and Most Promising categories must be won by different CMS's. This is to ensure that more than one open source CMS benefits from the Award

Congrats to all the CMS that were selected as winners. The way Packt ran the competition shows that there are lots of high quality CMS programs out there.

Christefano-oldaccount’s picture

Thanks for the concise explanation. I was wondering about that, too.

najibx’s picture

It means Drupal won over Joomla. Well, they have own merits i.e easily to use (for new comers) ...anyhow, I have long left Joomla.
Congratulation to Drupal and big thanks to all hard working and smart Contributors...

-najibx-

andrew.eddie’s picture

Well done Drupal. It's an honour to come second place to such a worthy project :) ... but there's always next year, hehe.

Seriously though, this is a well deserved win for you. In all my time in the CMS world I've had a lot of respect for you guys. Keep up the great work and never grow tired of striving for excellence.

Regards,
Andrew Eddie
Joomla! Lead Developer

webchick’s picture

Thanks a lot, Andrew, and right back at you! You guys have been doing a rockin' job of getting 1.5 really solid.

PS: Nice handle. :D My partner's a huge Halo fan. :)

Walt Esquivel’s picture

Hey Andrew,

Thank you for congratulating Drupal. Right back at you and congrats to Joomla!. Your post demonstrates professionalism and a positive sportsmanlike attitude.

Keep up the good work.

Walt Esquivel, MBA; MA; President, Wellness Corps; Captain, USMC (Veteran)
$50 Hosting Discount Helps Projects Needing Financing

Gman’s picture

It is so good to be recognized this time around. Last year losing the tie breaker to Joomla was heart breaking. Go Drupal, Go Drupal 6!

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Drupal Blog
Dog Parks via Drupal

themegarden.org’s picture

Congratulations to Drupal.org Team, Drupal.org contributors and Drupal.org community!

Hope this will help growing community (which is already fast-growing: yesterday Drupal.org Cracks 200,000 Users).

---
Drupal Theme Garden

Aristocrat’s picture

Congratulation Drupal! Excellent work!

regards,

Rastin Mehr - Joomla! DWG Member

www.rmdStudio.com
www.Tazzu.com

gpk’s picture

Thanks Rastin (and Andrew) for taking the trouble to post here. I must say Joomla 1.5 does have some nice functionality out of the box, so look forward to seeing y'all again same time same place next year ..!

gpk
----
www.alexoria.co.uk

Amazon’s picture

Congratulations to the entire community. We've worked really hard in 2006 and 2007 to make Drupal a success.

A special thank you to Neil Drumm and the maintainers of Drupal 5 who got a great release of Drupal 5 out in 2007. Drupal 5 helped Drupal double it's popularity as measured by downloads. Neil and the core maintainers focus on improving the user experience for Drupal administrators helped us close the gap. I've personally watched the Joomla lead developers in action, and being able to compete with Johann and the Joomla crew is a great accomplishment.

A special thanks to Steven Peck and the docs team. Open source's biggest problem continues to be support. The docs team have done a great job re-organizing the Drupal handbooks and making the docs relevant and useful for Drupal 5 users. It's no small effort, and they've done a great job ensuring that Drupal 5 was well supported.

The Drupal community rocks!

Cheers,
Kieran

CTO CivicSpace
Try hosted and pre-configured Drupal 5 profile
http://civicspacelabs.org/create

Kieran Lal

eigentor’s picture

I'm especially amazed by the words of Andrew and Rastin. This should be kept up and respect being paid vice versa. For we way too often bash Joomla without even knowing it thoroughly. Main thing the "younger" systems show the older "bigships" that it can be done with an approach easier to grasp and less code. So slim down, whoever wasn't in the first three and you're back in the race.... Hah it's bloody great being in Ben Hur's Car for once...

I'm happy being miserable

transwarptim’s picture

Don't assume people who criticize Jooma! don't know it thoroughly.

I spent 6 months trying to give Joomla! and honest chance with both test sites and trying to build a production site with both the 1.x and new 1.5 versions. The interface is easier for most people (esp newbies) to use and I really wanted it to work out.

But, I kept hitting my head against the wall with it desperate to like it because it's a little easier to use. But between their limited taxonomy system -- and modules with their own taxonomies -- and lack of sef url's (outside of contrib modules) in 1.x and the totally nonsentialca one in 1.5, I finally had enough and came back to Drupal and that's where I intend to stay. Updating from 1.x to 1.5 wasn't a true update, but a reinstall and reconfiguration of the database. Most contrib module developers weren't interested in working on modules/module versions for 1.5 until it went final, which completely blows me away. Modules need to be ready for the final release so users can update as soon as the new one is final. Drupal excels in all of these areas and I can live with the sometimes confusing interface.

I really only found 2 areas where Joomla! excelled over Drupal: The user interface (which is getting better with each successive release) and the built in WYSWYG editor (Drupal Core Developers, take note, please please please add this to 6.0).

Drupal is simply a better system no matter what kind of site you are designing -- blog, static site, or something in between -- and I voted for it in every category possible in the awards. I'm ticked pink it won top honors and did so well in the other two categories.

Joomla! has promise BUT it has a long way to go before it touches the awesome power and flexibility of Drupal.

Tim

EDIT: not really sure why this got placed in the thread where it did. It's not a direct response to the person ahead of me.

louis.landry’s picture

Congratulations guys and gals,

A lot of hard work goes into producing this software ... both in the limelight and behind the scenes. You all have been doing a great job for a long time and I know that little reminders like this go a long way. Congrats to all involved and good luck into the future... it is going to be an interesting ride for sure.

- Louis Landry
Joomla! Project Manager & Lead Developer

Sree’s picture

Congracts!!!!!!!
Drupal and the community deserves it ....

-- Sree --
IRC Nick: sreeveturi

broham’s picture

CONGRATULATIONS and THANK YOU to all that have contributed to the success of Drupal.

Also, much respect to the Joomla! gang for their win and good will.

Andrzej7’s picture

Congratulations for Dries and all the Great Team!!!

Your work is wonderful - and thanks to it - we can run our webpages.

Thanks.

Andrzej

drupalisme’s picture

From Joomla! Wins Best PHP Open Source Content Management System

In fact, the judges noted a number of factors that helped Joomla! secure the Award. Most notably its good front-end for administrators and end-users, which gives users a simple and traditional company website straight out of the box.

Even on Drupal 6, these features still not implemented:

  1. Drupal can't create database while Joomla can. Mean you can not install Drupal out-of-the-box!
  2. Drupal has no separate back-end for admin (Drupal only provides different theme) while Joomla has
  3. Drupal has no built-in editor while Joomla has
  4. Drupal has limited settings for frontpage while Joomla supports most settings
  5. Drupal has no web based module/theme repository, Developers need to use separate tools again like smart-cvs and turtle cvs
  6. Drupal terms make confuse: it's say Categories but when you try to make new category Drupal say "Vocabulary"
  7. Drupal has NO FEATURE TO INSTALL MODULE/THEMES !!! You need other tools at least ftp or cpanel-file manager! How come a CMS does not have feature to install module/theme? Joomla interface can upload and extract any components/modules or themes/templates.

To Drupal core team:
Don't be angry! I listed above disadvantage to make us create Drupal better and better. Go Drupal!

phpdude’s picture

First of all, I do think these are good features to add but they are definitely not the most important.

1. So?
2. So?
3. I personally don't use WYSIWYG editor. Why should I upload it just to disable it later?. If someone needs it, he/she can install a module (there are more than one).
4. Yes and No. (Out of the box- you are right. But there are modules for this.)
5. If you need #1, you don't need this. If you need this, you don't need #1.
6. I Agree
7. Again, personally, I don't have any problem with uploading the module using FTP client.

Anyway, thanks to the great Drupal community, I don't have to pay for components.

link
Compare here: who has more red areas?

So.. Thanks to all the Drupal developers and its great community for this awesome and totally free open source PHP CMS / framework.

lelizondo’s picture

I moved from Joomla to Drupal just a month ago and now i finally see the light. I agree, Joomla best modules and components aren't free, and Drupal's let's you do almost anything.

The main reason I moved from Joomla to Drupal it's because for some reason Joomla makes it so difficult to users to add content if you don't have access to the backend. Now with Drupal I'm using content types, taxonomy and views so the user just selects where the new content wants to be displayed. It's so easy and the images module makes it even easier if you want thumbnails. This is what I've been looking for the last couple of years. Now I'm asking myself why I spent 2 years using Joomla.

One thing I have to say about Joomla is the great templates (themes) availables. We'll have to work on it. Right now, I'm porting my first theme from Joomla to Drupal so I get the best of both worlds, the great designers in Joomla's community and the best CMS available.

Thanks to all the Drupal developers and its great community.

Luis

drupalisme’s picture

7. Again, personally, I don't have any problem with uploading the module using FTP client.

I have almost 100 clients using Drupal since I didn't use Joomla anymore. One day the client found a nice module/theme and he want to install the module/theme. How to install a module/theme in Drupal?

  1. First he must know how to use FTP
  2. FTP port 21 must be opened
  3. Some proxy server need FTP client to use Passive Mode
  4. He must download a FTP client or use Cpanel/Helm (if he has Cpanel/Helm). My favorit FTP (SmartFTP) is 4.2 MB.
  5. He must know how to extract a tgz file locally or using Cpanel-Extract
  6. He must create new folder on /sites/all/ for module and theme !!!
  7. He must not put the module on /public_html/modules! instead, use /public_html/sites/all/modules
  8. He may call me: hey my FTP not run, check port 21? how to?, what is the best FTP client?, can i use winrar to extract tgz?, please install XYZ module for me!, bla...bla...bla...
  9. Client: Must I extract XYZ.module to /public_html/XYZ or /public_html/sites/all/module/XYZ or .. or ?
  10. Client: I upload the XYZ module to the root, how to move to /public_html/sites/all/module/XYZ ?

Imagine if Drupal provide a web based installer like other CMSs have. User just click on MODULE INSTALLER while Drupal will automatic:
- upload the COMPRESSED FILE, extract it and install it!
- Drupal will automatic put the module on sites/all/modules if it's a module

More than 90% of my clients are not Web Developer or have computer background! A module installer feature will make Drupal USABILITY better and make my live as Web Developer easier :)

3. I personally don't use WYSIWYG editor.

My clients need to insert an image into colored table in his article. He likes to use Verdana Font with 14pt, red color and rgb(200,093,131) background color. Guess .. you know the next story of my clients :)

NOTE: I can make my own WYSIWYG Editor module. I also can CREATE a FTP Server or Client! Even Drupal has many contributed modules but you know some IMPORTANT module should be in the core according to its security and integrity. My focus is to make Drupal better than before!

webchick’s picture

The only way to ensure that an itch is scratched is to take action to directly help the changes you want to make along. Since your customers have this need, and since you have coding skills behind you, you're already at a great starting point for making strides toward a patch for Drupal 7 core.

Before you begin, I would start with this sub-thread in a development list discussion late last year, about the security implications of such an auto-installation tool and what needs to be done before it could ever be considered for core: http://lists.drupal.org/pipermail/development/2006-November/020986.html. Among the useful takeaway points are that PHP should *never* be allowed to write to itself, and that blindly overwriting someone's installation could cause havoc. These are not little problems to contend with in the least, which probably explains the reluctance of other developers to work on them.

You may also be able to look at how other projects which offer such a feature are implementing them. If they're doing so in a secure way, make note of how they're doing it. Compare and contrast approaches, and send a report along to the development list for discussion. Putting your efforts into an actionable "plan" might help you get more volunteers, and will in any case be far more successful than an expectation/demand will.

kipkoan’s picture

One day the client found a nice module/theme and he want to install the module/theme. How to install a module/theme in Drupal?

I would recommend to your clients that they have someone experienced with Drupal (and ftp) install the module for them. Hopefully that person would know how to test it first to make sure it's not going to break the production website, and fix any problems it may cause. I personally don't think that someone should be adding modules to Drupal if they don't know how to use ftp and shell. I'm sure a lot of people will disagree with me, though. :)

GoofyX’s picture

I surely agree with you. A user that is not familiar with the terms ftp, ssh, file permissions, etc. must not be able to simply install a module with a single click inside a Drupal production site, without thoughly testing it first. I've used both Joomla and Drupal and I like the Drupal way better.
--
... Morpheus: What is "real"? How do you define "real"? If you 're talking about what you can feel, what you can smell, what you can taste and see, then "real" is simply electrical signals interpreted by your brain...

--
... Morpheus: What is "real"? How do you define "real"? If you 're talking about what you can feel, what you can smell, what you can taste and see, then "real" is simply electrical signals interpreted by your brain...

Walt Esquivel’s picture

Just the other day, I downloaded a Drupal contributed module and then uploaded it to my test (non-production) web site via FTP (I use FileZilla - a "good enough" free, open source FTP client). The contributed module worked nicely for a few minutes and then I started noticing ugly error messages when I logged out. I logged back in, disabled the contributed module I had just uploaded, and then uninstalled it via my admin account. Still, ugly error messages persisted. Next, i deleted the entire folder via FTP. Yet ugly messages still persisted. I believe this module affected one or more other modules in some nasty way.

What was the recourse on my test web site? I purged all data (all Drupal 5.3 and contrib mod files, directories, and the database) and reinstalled a fresh version of everything I had installed minus the one problem contrib mod - the one that caused the nasty error messages. No harm done.

Now if a client had gone through my actions, it probably would have been on his/her production web site. Imagine the HUGE problem with that! Imagine the frustration of having the production web site with nasty error messages publicized to the public. Not a good scenario. I'm pretty sure the web site developer would be getting an emergency phone call from a panic-stricken client.

I'm not saying I'm against auto-installers, but I am saying that if the client isn't skilled enough to do thorough testing on a test site before running things on a production web site, he/she has no business auto-installing contributed modules, IMO. So if a web site developer can get a client to thoroughly test an auto-installed contributed module on a test site before auto-installing it on a production web site, that would be a step in the right direction.

And by the way, "Step Away From the FTP Client..." had me laughing hard! Too funny! Please step away...NOW! LOL.

Walt Esquivel, MBA; MA; President, Wellness Corps; Captain, USMC (Veteran)
$50 Hosting Discount Helps Projects Needing Financing

GoofyX’s picture

Now if a client had gone through my actions, it probably would have been on his/her production web site. Imagine the HUGE problem with that! Imagine the frustration of having the production web site with nasty error messages publicized to the public. Not a good scenario. I'm pretty sure the web site developer would be getting an emergency phone call from a panic-stricken client.

IMHO, this is a different matter. To be able to install easily and intuitively a module is one thing, to know the risks to install a new and untested module in a production server is another, so let's not confuse these two. However, I agree with you in both matters.
--
... Morpheus: What is "real"? How do you define "real"? If you 're talking about what you can feel, what you can smell, what you can taste and see, then "real" is simply electrical signals interpreted by your brain...

--
... Morpheus: What is "real"? How do you define "real"? If you 're talking about what you can feel, what you can smell, what you can taste and see, then "real" is simply electrical signals interpreted by your brain...

transwarptim’s picture

Now if a client had gone through my actions, it probably would have been on his/her production web site. Imagine the HUGE problem with that! Imagine the frustration of having the production web site with nasty error messages publicized to the public. Not a good scenario. I'm pretty sure the web site developer would be getting an emergency phone call from a panic-stricken client.

Had the same problem with Joomla 1.5 (even with modules which supposedly worked on 1.5) and it's worse over there because it puts files in at least 2 places

Tim

transwarptim’s picture

NOTE: I can make my own WYSIWYG Editor module. I also can CREATE a FTP Server or Client! Even Drupal has many contributed modules but you know some IMPORTANT module should be in the core according to its security and integrity. My focus is to make Drupal better than before!

I think they've avoided adding one to the core because there are so many to choose from and people are very opinionated as to which is better.

I totally agree that one should be chosen and added (I love the one in Joomla 1.5, for what it's worth). For those who don't use one, just like those who do not use forums or whatever they can turn it off.

Tim

louis.landry’s picture

Joomla! has weaknesses just as Drupal has weaknesses just like every other CMS out there does open source or not. Everyone has a particular flavor they like ... and we should all be grateful that there are so MANY flavors out there for us to choose from. Let's not make this into a Joomla! vs. Drupal debate, this is a time for celebration all around. There is a time and place for objective comparison and push for improvement, this isn't it.

Congrats again guys,

- Louis Landry
Joomla! Project Manager & Lead Developer

eaton’s picture

... Wanna trade a node system for a secure FTP API? ;) I've been poking around the 1.5 APIs and I'm jealous. *grin*

--
Lullabot! | Eaton's blog | VotingAPI discussion

seitenweberei.ch’s picture

I'm working on two websites and decided few weeks ago to build one with drupal and the other with joomla. Each of them fit best for the purpose of the corresponding site and future admin/users. I agree that having a choice is the most valuable thing. The awards confirmed, that I've chosen two of the best. Many thanks to the contributors of these two CMS.

yaph’s picture

I think both communities/systems can learn from each other. Drupal does some things better than Joomla and vice versa. It's often a matter knowledge which system you prefer. Having more than one good system out there is healthy, because you need to constantly improve to remain a good choice.

--
Websites: SEO-Expert-Blog.com | Torlaune.de

jackdaw’s picture

I agree with #6. Drupal should clean up terms, also to make localization easier.

That being said, I moved from Joomla to Drupal more than a year ago, and am not going back. I like especially the social qualities of Drupal, the built-in comment system, stronger RSS, and that my users for some reason found it easier to post on a Drupal site than a Joomla one, maybe because #2 is a feature rather than a weakness - non-administrators feel intimidated by being moved to a totally different looking backend.

And Joomla definitely has its weaknesses to. When will version 1.5 be released, and will there be any free modules left?

Michelle’s picture

I started with Drupal so I've never used something with a separate back end. That sounds horribly confusing. I like things just fine as they are. I don't even use a separate admin theme unless I'm using a theme that doesn't work well with the tables the admin stuff uses.

Michelle

--------------------------------------
See my Drupal articles and tutorials or come check out life in the Coulee Region.

transwarptim’s picture

I started with Drupal so I've never used something with a separate back end. That sounds horribly confusing. I like things just fine as they are. I don't even use a separate admin theme unless I'm using a theme that doesn't work well with the tables the admin stuff uses.

It can be. It's not so bad with cms's where you can also edit the pages from the front side of the site but it's really more than you really need. Joomla isn't too bad here. I've seen much worse but Drupal's integration is much cleaner.

Tim

transwarptim’s picture

And Joomla definitely has its weaknesses to. When will version 1.5 be released, and will there be any free modules left?

I was beginning to wonder the same thing. Most of the worthwhile modules for 1.5 were indeed paid when I abandoned it about a month ago. And the free module developers were slow slow slow in upgrading to support 1.5.

Tim

Ole Martin’s picture

Great job. Keep going straight forward the Drupalway.

In this litle Contry called Norway, Drupal wasn't so god known before. Joomla was the most known CMS for a long time. BUT now, more and more people have started to be more familiar with Drupal and there are lot of sites going from Joomla to Drupal. We in Drupal.no are helping them over (I was one of them) The Drupal community here in Norway are growing fast.

Drupal-id.com

no 1. Nonsen.
no 2. God
no.3 What will you suggest?
no.4 and 5 Because Drupal are built like a real module-cms. Use a module and you get wath you want
no. 6 After some time you will remember it
no.7 Oh, my lord, I'm happy for that. How do you get your Joomla to your site?
"Joomla interface can upload and extract any components/modules or themes/templates." And if somethings goes wrong? You have to search several places to manuelly remove files.

Drupal will be better and better if the team don't follow "The joomla-way. (for a time ago, on a Norwegian site, I made the guide to install (sorry people) Joomla. I know Joomla verry well, and therefor I use Drupal.

And again, thanks for a effective good work

Ole Martin
http://www.drupal.no

For new people in Drupal who want to know:
Terms, stolen from http://xaneon.com/migrating-from-joomla-mambo

1. Template in Joomla is called as Theme.
2. Component = Module.
3. Module = Block.
4. Mambot/Plugin = ? ( I don't know yet!!! )
5. Menu-Horizontal = Primary Links
6. Menu-Vertical = Navigation
7. Dynamic Article/Content= Story
8. Static Content = Page
9. Back-end = there are no back-end in Drupal!
10. SEF/SEO = Clean URL but some docs refer to SEF or SEO too.
11. Section = Category
13. Section Title = Vocabulary Name
12. Category = Sub-category or Term
14. Introtext = Teaser
15. Maintext = Body
16. Pathway = Breadcrumbs

transwarptim’s picture

Allow me to address these:

1. Drupal can't create database while Joomla can. Mean you can not install Drupal out-of-the-box!

Why would you want it to CREATE databases out of the box? You need to use your root mysql user to do that and that's not exactly the most secure way of doing things, especially if it is later going to be saved in a configuration file on the server. In this day in age where prety much everybody has access to InterWorx, Pleak, Cpanel, DiractAdmin, or at least phpMyAdmin it's not a big deal to create the database first. I would like to see Drupal auto-create/edit the cofig file though.

2. Drupal has no separate back-end for admin (Drupal only provides different theme) while Joomla has

?? so? I actually find that more confusing.

3. Drupal has no built-in editor while Joomla has

Totally agree, but there are several you can install easily enough.

4. Drupal has limited settings for frontpage while Joomla supports most settings

I'm not sure what you mean here. With blocks and the front module and a little hand coding you can do anything you want in the front page.

5. Drupal has no web based module/theme repository, Developers need to use separate tools again like smart-cvs and turtle cvs

Not sure why you'd be using cvs tools on a live site as files in CVS are not always the most stable.

I just wget the module I want into place and then tar -zxf it open. The only cms I can think of that has a true web based module interface is Typo3. Joomla! is a little easier than Drupal but I get confused by the 3 types of add ons. Joomla is a little easier but you still need the url to the module or need to download it to your computer and then upload it again.

6. Drupal terms make confuse: it's say Categories but when you try to make new category Drupal say "Vocabulary"

That's a leftover Drupal's roots. Be great full the interface does not still say Taxonomy like the versions before 5.x did. I too would like to see the simple terms Category and Sub-Category adopted.

7. Drupal has NO FEATURE TO INSTALL MODULE/THEMES !!! You need other tools at least ftp or cpanel-file manager! How come a CMS does not have feature to install module/theme? Joomla interface can upload and extract any components/modules or themes/templates.

Well one reason is security. To do that you have to make the themes and modules directory world writable (or at least writable to the web server). The fewer places you do that the better.

Tim

kipkoan’s picture

6. Drupal terms make confuse: it's say Categories but when you try to make new category Drupal say "Vocabulary"
That's a leftover Drupal's roots. Be great full the interface does not still say Taxonomy like the versions before 5.x did. I too would like to see the simple terms Category and Sub-Category adopted.

I think the term "Category" is too limited in scope for what Taxonomies actually are. I'd prefer they make it consistent, though: use "Taxonomies" throughout, with a "help link" to introduce people to what taxonomies are, and how to use them (to create categories, sub-categories, tagging, free-tagging, etc.).

transwarptim’s picture

I think the term "Category" is too limited in scope for what Taxonomies actually are. I'd prefer they make it consistent, though: use "Taxonomies" throughout, with a "help link" to introduce people to what taxonomies are, and how to use them (to create categories, sub-categories, tagging, free-tagging, etc.).

Taxonomy is just a fancy term for the same thing. I think I know what you are getting at but the use of the word Category does not mean that an article can not have more than one categorization. They took the term taxonomy out of the interface with 5.x thou the URL and module name remained the same.

Tim

kipkoan’s picture

Maybe "Categories/Tags" would be better? In my mind, tags are different than categories.

infojunkie’s picture

The Drupal community really deserves this award. Great software and great people! I find Drupal especially stimulating for the intellect, for two reasons: first, as a information architect, I get information management features that I haven't seen anywhere else (especially the concepts of node, node type and taxonomy). Second, as a software programmer, I feel like I am dealing with a new paradigm, namely the (now-cliché) Lego programming model. But it's real: we're tiling building blocks and connectors to make a whole, and that's awesome! I'm happy to be part of this community and I hope to be useful to it.

nvahalik’s picture

This is great news!

radiozapote’s picture

felicidades a todos los drupaleros.
esto es software libre!

hazart’s picture

Congratulations! Drupal deserves it!

jsimonis’s picture

Congratulations on the award!

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janwari’s picture

Drupal has again proven without shadow of a doubt that it now IS the BIG dog in the CMS market space.

Congrats to all Drupalists :)

adhiarta’s picture

First congratulations to Drupal, i think the real battle is CMS Award '08 between Drupal 6, Joomla 1.5, and Modx 0.97 (with xPDO and Context concept), three CMS with great framework and great community, but the real winner is Open Source Community !!!

saidi’s picture

I love Drupal!

twood’s picture

Congrats to all Drupaliers... we all win!

marcrobinsone’s picture

Before it gets too mushy with the huggin' and the kissin', let me give a crazy asian ritual dance to the Drupal community!

This gives me more pleasure and more reason to love & use Drupal. Congratulations.

Cheers to Dries and Axl!

8manj-dupe’s picture

Well done Drupal, well worth the recognition, everyone involved from founders, core developers, right through the community should be proud!

gunwitch’s picture

Really glad to hear this. Drupal is a great CMS, which deserves to be recognized.

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brucebanner’s picture

If I was a superhero I would be Drupalman

rosgar’s picture

There's a new mascot in town! Drupalman!

Nguyen DO’s picture

I love Drupal, i am developing my sites that base on Drupal. I hope there are more developers and webmaster know Drupal.

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72dpi’s picture

This is fantastic stuff.

Also shows where the drupal community can help out, and expand even further, IE, Social networking capabilities.

I am a Joomla Convert, and Love Druapl.

Thanks to all who help, contribute, and support this.
keep up the great work!

radiozapote’s picture

felicidades a quienes han aportado al desarrollo del drupal hasta llegar a ser una de las formas mas directas, plasticas y logicas de publicacion en la red.

representando orgullosamente nuestras ideas desde Mexico atraves del drupal!

http://zapote.radiolivre.org
http://flujos.org
http://enah.sarava.org

drupal rifa tambien en las tierras aztecas.

move on to the next level!

jayeshpau’s picture

Congratulation to Drupal again.

Drupal has Proved technic and popularity in CMS Market.

Drupal has again proven without any shadow of a doubt that it now IS the BIG LION in the CMS market space.

Congrats to all Drupal Users

Thanks
Jayesh

SEO Services UK
www.website-control.co.uk

btnehuse’s picture

Congratulation to Drupal
Drupal is realy Best PHP Open Source Content Management System in the world

http://archive.kefirtanesi.com