Examples for Developer #10 Week of Coding

Posted by Abhishek Lal | GSoC Blog - 9 Aug 2017 at 13:56 UTC
Examples for Developer #10 Week of Coding Abhishek Lal B Wed, 08/09/2017 - 19:26

The Absolute Beginners Guide to Drupal Distributions

Posted by OSTraining - 9 Aug 2017 at 10:28 UTC
The Absolute Beginners Guide to Drupal Distributions

One of the most common hurdles that Drupal beginners face is learning to navigate the modules area on Drupal.org.

We often hear questions like this:

"There are over 38,000 modules! How we do know which ones to use?"

The answer is often to use a distribution.

Building your own e-commerce, intranet or a social networking site in Drupal can be intimidating. Imagine how much easier it would be if an expert had found all the best modules for your purpose and had combined them into one package. Imagine that you could download and install that package as easily as a normal copy of Drupal. That's what distributions can do for you.

How I Stepped My Way Through a Failing Drush Drupal 8 Migration With PHPStorm’s Xdebug Integration: Part 2...

Posted by Appnovation Technologies - 9 Aug 2017 at 08:13 UTC
How I Stepped My Way Through a Failing Drush Drupal 8 Migration With PHPStorm’s Xdebug Integration: Part 2... Hot on the heels of my last blog, let's pick up where we left off... Stepping Through Drush We’re now ready to activate CLI debugging in PHPStorm. Let’s test our debugger on Drush. Under “Run > Edit Configurations”, click “+” and create a new PHP Script. Under “File:”...

Decoupled Drupal: A 10,000 ft View

Posted by Elevated Third - 8 Aug 2017 at 16:56 UTC
Decoupled Drupal: A 10,000 ft View Decoupled Drupal: A 10,000 ft View Andy Mead Tue, 08/08/2017 - 10:56 Ski resort image for Decoupled Drupal ebook

Continued from Setting the Stage: Hosting a Decoupled Drupal Site...

With numerous ski resorts, several Camp Woodward destinations around the country, and roughly 50 unique events hosted each year, the content demands of POWDR’s portfolio are significant. Managing the volume and variety of this content is a challenge in itself - and managing it across disparate systems with different processes and siloed data makes it much harder. With that in mind, POWDR set out to unify the technology driving their digital presence using a new platform powered by Drupal 8.

The Requirements

The platform needed to serve two seemingly different goals: flexibility allowing for different designs on the frontend and a uniform data model on the backend for maintaining content. To meet these needs, POWDR opted for a decoupled approach, using the backend system as a data API that’s consumed by individual frontends that can be styled however necessary, and at times, completely differently.

Visual of paragraphs influencing parent site

The Responsibilities

With our partners Hoorooh Digitial and Acquia providing the frontend and hosting solutions respectively, our job at Elevated Third was to design and build the data layer at the platform’s center. As Drupal experts, we knew Drupal 8 had the right tools for this job. Our solution used a combination of Drupal 8’s REST API, Views, the Paragraphs module, and some custom modules to provide the right amount of flexibility and maintainability for POWDR’s needs.

An Initial Architectural Consideration

When building a solution like this, the first decision will revolve around structuring the technology powering it. Currently, there are a couple architectural options in the decoupled application landscape.

The first option consists of running two servers: one for the frontend application(s) and one for the backend data API. In this scenario, the frontends are responsible for all the routing and the backend simply provides a JSON endpoint that communicates with the frontends.

The second option consists of storing the frontend applications as compiled assets on the same server as the backend. In this scenario, the backend will respond to initial incoming requests and route them to the proper frontend application which takes over from there.

There’s not a right or a wrong choice here. And any decision will depend on the combination of hosting options, technical expertise, and development team’s appetite for complexity. We chose the second option. And after some fiddling with HTTP requests and Apache proxying, the POWDR platform has been performing excellently.

To Be Continued...

In the next entry of this blog series, my project partner Joe Flores will detail some of specific Drupal technologies and techniques we used to power POWDR.

Thanks for reading!

Decoupled Drupal: A 10,000-foot View

Posted by Acquia Developer Center Blog - 8 Aug 2017 at 16:40 UTC
snow

A few weeks ago, we began a blog series about a decoupled Drupal project we worked on with Elevated Third and Hoorooh.

The project was for Powdr Resorts, one of the largest ski operators in North America.

The first installment was A Deep Dive into a Decoupled Drupal 8 Project.

Tags: acquia drupal planet

Drupalcon Takeaways - Enzo

Posted by DrupalCon News - 8 Aug 2017 at 16:19 UTC

Oh! Hey there, my name is Piyush Jain and as a new staff member at the Drupal Association I wanted to learn what the community likes so much about DrupalCon.

This week, I spoke with Eduardo Garcia (-enzo-), a Drupal Console core maintainer. Eduardo has been part of the Drupal community for 9.5 years, and has attended 6 DrupalCons.

Meet Primer - our Drupal 8 solution for all kinds of organizations

Posted by MD Systems blog - 8 Aug 2017 at 15:26 UTC
We created a Drupal 8 distribution that will give you many powerful features and a great website for less than 5000 CHF. Order it now and go live with your website in a few weeks!

Promoting paid services within the Drupal community

Posted by Jacob Rockowitz - 8 Aug 2017 at 15:12 UTC

Drupal: Getting Paid to Do What I Love

I’ve been planning and working toward this moment for long time. The latest Webform feature is not for the community, it is for me. This new feature, which I’m calling "Promotions," provides me with compensation to do what I love: collaborate and build free software that is used by 1000's of websites.

Getting paid to write open source software is a known challenge. I’ve been exploring many options and researching how other open source projects promote and charge for add-ons, support, and additional services.

Promise: Free of Charge

Please understand I have no intention of ever charging for add-ons. That said, if people in the Drupal community started sponsoring features, I’d be completely on board. Is offering paid support a viable option? I’m not sure. I think promoting additional services is a proven approach. Many companies provide SaaS solutions and hosting services for Drupal. I’ve spent the past year learning how to promote myself via my website, blog posts, and presentations at conferences. Promoting myself in all these ways led me to recognize that my best opportunity lies directly within the Webform module's user experience.

Research: Promotional Banner

Ninja Forms for Wordpress has an amazing user experience. When installing Ninja Forms, there is a "Ninja banner" which promotes the plugin's latest features. I have never seen a Drupal module display a promotional banner or ​callout within the actual module. Project pages rarely contain promotional callouts. Banners and splash screens are part of the typical software experience. I realized I needed to sell the Drupal community on having a promotional banner within the Webform module's user experience.

Challenge: Selling...Read More

Decoupled Drupal and Ember

Posted by Nextide Blog - 8 Aug 2017 at 14:51 UTC
Decoupled Drupal and Ember blaine Tue, 08/08/2017 - 10:51

This is the first in a series of articles that will document lessons learned while exploring using Ember as a decoupled client with Drupal.

You will need to have Ember CLI installed and a local Drupal 8 (local development assumed). This initial series of articles is based on Ember 2.14 and Drupal 8.3.5 but my initial development was over 6 months ago with earlier versions of both Ember so this should work if you have an earlier ember 2.11 or so installed.

Decoupled Drupal and Ember

Posted by Nextide Blog - 8 Aug 2017 at 14:51 UTC
Decoupled Drupal and Ember blaine Tue, 08/08/2017 - 10:51

This is the first in a series of articles that will document lessons learned while exploring using Ember as a decoupled client with Drupal.

You will need to have Ember CLI installed and a local Drupal 8 (local development assumed). This initial series of articles is based on Ember 2.14 and Drupal 8.3.5 but my initial development was over 6 months ago with earlier versions of both Ember so this should work if you have an earlier ember 2.11 or so installed.

Optimize your site for search engines due to Drupal 8

Posted by InternetDevels - 8 Aug 2017 at 12:38 UTC
Drupal 8 SEO

Drupal 8 is the latest version of Drupal that receives a lot of attention among Drupal community. Its minor release Drupal 8.3.0 has already come out. Each its feature is interesting and is described in our collection of Drupal 8 articles. In today’s blog post Drupal 8 will also be in focus, however from the angle of SEO.

Read more

What’s on the Drop Guard roadmap this month? A forecast

Posted by Drop Guard - 8 Aug 2017 at 10:45 UTC
What’s on the Drop Guard roadmap this month? A forecast

Drop Guard is in a continuous process of optimization and development. As it is still a unique platform concept on the market place, we started years ago with a sketchy blueprint of what Drop Guard is today - and rather will be in future. With this post I will give you a quick overview of what is planned and something which is a little secret between you and me.

 

Drop Guard Drupal Drupal Planet announcements

AGILEDROP: Top Drupal blogs from July

Posted by Agiledrop.com Blog - 8 Aug 2017 at 10:41 UTC
Holidays are at the peak, so some activities rest. But not in Drupal. There were many blog posts written in the past month by us in by other authors. Since we already presented our part, it's time to look at the others and present the Top Drupal Blogs from July. We'll begin our list with Michael Silverman and his 6 Reasons to use Drupal vs Wordpress. The author discusses all the numbers that favour Wordpress and then completely turns the blog post to the reasons why Drupal is better suited for your (business) website than Wordpress. A little hint. Reasons are connected with growth. We… READ MORE

Decoupled Developer Days - New York

Posted by Amazee Labs - 8 Aug 2017 at 06:45 UTC
Decoupled Developer Days - New York

The upcoming Decoupled Developer Days, at the NBCUniversal NYC Headquarters in New York, is taking place from 19-20 August 2017.

It’s a small developer-focused conference for architects, developers, and businesspeople who are involved in implementing decoupled Drupal architectures in their various lines of work.

Anli de Jager Tue, 08/08/2017 - 08:45 Decoupled Developer Days - New York

Decoupled Drupal is the use of Drupal as a content service for other non-Drupal applications, whether they are in native desktop or mobile, universal JavaScript, set-top boxes, IoT devices, conversational interfaces, or other technologies.

This 2-day conference will create a platform for those involved in decoupled Drupal architectures to come together to share their knowledge and insights during a single track of sessions about decoupled architecture strategies, technology, and best practices. There will also be opportunities to contribute to the learning experience through the building of open-source projects in sprints.

Decoupled Drupal Sites not only bring exciting new technologies to us. They also require a new way of thinking around local development and hosting. At Amazee our speciality is Decoupling Drupal with React and GraphQL and we have multiple Decoupled Sites running, all with enabled Server-Side-Rendering, CDNs and Reverse Proxies included!

Our very own Michael "schnitzel" Schmid will, therefore, be hosting a session, ‘Your PHP and Nginx won't be enough to host and develop your decoupled site’ that will address some of these questions that will undoubtedly come up, for example:

  • How to develop Node locally with multiple Node versions, test CORS and Server-Side-Rendering locally and make overall sure that my Node App behaves locally the same as in production.

  • How do I deploy, test and host that on a server when using ServerSide Rendering of my Decoupled Site built in Node.

  • How to use a CDN to cache my GraphQL/REST/JsonAPI requests and also the Server-Side-Rendering response.

In this session, Michael will also show you how the power of Docker allows to develop Decoupled Drupal Sites with Node and Server-Side-Rendering with a breeze and also how to use the same Docker Tools to run them in staging and production. No Docker Knowledge required :)

For more conference updates, you can follow the action here.

Markdown Won’t Solve Your Content Problems

Posted by Lullabot - 7 Aug 2017 at 19:25 UTC

(This article was cross-posted from Medium.)

Every few weeks I hear from a colleague who’s dealing with the tangles of editorial tools on a web CMS project. Inevitably, someone on their team suggests that things will be easier if users can’t enter HTML at all. “We’ll use Markdown,” they say. “It’s simple.”

On most projects, it’s a terrible idea — and I’m going to rant about it. If you don’t care about the nerdy details, though, here’s the long and short of it:

Markdown turns common “plaintext” formatting conventions like asterisks, indentation, and so on into HTML markup. If you need anything more complicated (say, an image with a caption or a link that opens in a new window), you need to mix markdown and raw HTML. Markdown is easy to remember for simple stuff (blockquotes, italics, headings, etc) but more complicated structures require extensions to the standard that are just as tweaky as HTML.

It was designed to mirror the ad-hoc conventions of ASCII-only channels like Usenet, email, and IRC. As creator John Gruber said in his original introduction of the project:

The overriding design goal for Markdown’s formatting syntax is to make it as readable as possible. The idea is that a Markdown-formatted document should be publishable as-is, as plain text, without looking like it’s been marked up with tags or formatting instructions.

Markdown’s strength is that it speeds and simplifies the most common text formatting tasks, and does so in a way that looks correct even before the markup is transformed into visual formatting. Markdown accomplishes that by ruthlessly cutting most HTML structures — anything that can’t be turned into a fairly straightforward ASCII-ism is left behind. When it’s pushed beyond that role, things get just as ugly any error-prone as raw HTML: witness the horrors of Markdown Tables and CSS In Markdown.

In many ways, Markdown is less a markup language and more a way to hide basic formatting information in a plain text document. That’s great! I use Markdown for my Jekyll-powered blog. If your project’s body field needs are simple text formatting without complicated embedding, captioning, microformatting, etc? Markdown is probably going to work fine. But — and this is a big one — if that’s all you need, then using a WYSIWYG HTML editor will also work fine.

WYSIWYG editors aren’t a pain because they “hide the code” from content creators. They’re problematic because they’re often configured to give editors access to the full range of HTML’s features, rather than the specific structural elements they really need to do their jobs. I’ve written about this “vocabulary mismatch” problem before, but it’s worth coming back to.

When you decide to use Markdown, you aren’t just choosing markup that’s easier to read; you're choosing a specific restrictive vocabulary. If that vocabulary covers your editors’ real needs, and they’ll be using plaintext to write and revise stories during their editorial workflow, by all means: consider it!

But if what you really need is a way to reign in chaotic, crappy markup, invest the time in figuring out how it’s being used in your content, what design requirements are being foisted on your editors, and what transformations are necessary for real world usage. Modern WYSIWYG editors don’t have to be the “dreamweaver in a div” disasters they used to be — taking the time to configure them carefully can give your team a clean, streamlined semantic editor that doesn’t constrain them unnecessarily.

Photo by Lee Campbell

New Course: Code a Custom Drupal Module

Posted by Envato Tuts+ - 7 Aug 2017 at 17:54 UTC
Final product imageWhat You'll Be Creating

If you want an easy way to create engaging, content-driven websites for you and your customers, you should give Drupal 8 a try. And Drupal modules allow you to take things a step further and create highly customized functionality for your site. 

In our new course, Code a Custom Drupal Module, Envato Tuts+ instructor Derek Jensen will get you up and running with modules in no time. You'll build a simple calculator module, and along the way you'll learn about creating routes, controllers, parameters, and more.

You can take our new course straight away with a subscription to Envato Elements. For a single low monthly fee, you get access not only to this course, but also to our growing library of over 1,000 video courses and industry-leading eBooks on Envato Tuts+. 

Plus you now get unlimited downloads from the huge Envato Elements library of 200,000+ photos and 26,000+ design assets and templates. Create with unique fonts, photos, graphics and templates, and deliver better projects faster.

 

Looking for a shortcut? Try downloading some of the ready-made Drupal themes on Envato Market.

Drupal Modules: The One Percent — Style Guide (video tutorial)

Posted by Drupal Modules: The One Percent - 7 Aug 2017 at 12:31 UTC
Drupal Modules: The One Percent — Style Guide (video tutorial) Project page screenshot NonProfit Mon, 08/07/2017 - 07:31 Episode 30

Here is where we bring awareness to Drupal modules running on less than 1% of reporting sites. Today we'll investigate Style Guide, a module which gathers common elements in one place, allowing you to  more efficiently determine which need to be styled.

Creating a modal in Drupal 8 with one line of HTML

Posted by Blair Wadman - 7 Aug 2017 at 10:11 UTC

Modal dialogs are incredibly useful on websites as they allow the user to do something without having to leave the web page they are on. Drupal 8 now has a Dialog API in core, which greatly reduces the amount of code you need to write to create a modal dialog. Dialogs in Drupal 8 leverage jQuery UI.

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