Installing (FREE) Let's Encrypt SSL Certificates on Acquia

Posted by Redfin Solutions - 2 May 2017 at 17:23 UTC
Chris May 02, 2017 Installing (FREE) Let's Encrypt SSL Certificates on Acquia

Recently, one of our Enterprise clients asked for some help installing SSL certificates on their Acquia-hosted Stage and Development environments. This is not something that Acquia seems to provide (they do provide basic SSL on dev/stage environments, but not with hostname matching), so we set out to get them set up. They use their dev and staging environments to demonstrate new content and features to stakeholders, and some were getting scared off by the SSL certificate warnings.

Installing Let's Encrypt Certificates on Acquia

Posted by Redfin Solutions - 2 May 2017 at 17:23 UTC
Chris May 02, 2017 Installing Let's Encrypt Certificates on Acquia

Recently, one of our Enterprise clients asked for some help installing SSL certificates on their Acquia-hosted Stage and Development environments. This is not something that Acquia seems to provide (they do provide basic SSL on dev/stage environments, but not with hostname matching), so we set out to get them set up. They use their dev and staging environments to demonstrate new content and features to stakeholders, and some were getting scared off by the SSL certificate warnings.

Using Price Set Fields in Drupal with CiviCRM Entity

Posted by CiviCRM Blog - 2 May 2017 at 14:15 UTC

As of CiviCRM Entity 2.0-beta4 the sub module called CiviCRM Entity Price Set Field provides a Drupal field type for the Event entity type.  In this article we’ll review the features of this submodule and discuss how to configure and customize it to fit your needs.

event-edit-financial.png

Event Registration on the Event view page

When configured to display on the Event view pages, this field generates a registration form that supports:

  • Registering multiple Participants
  • Uses the event’s price set and all price fields of any type
  • Pay later or credit card transactions utilizing CiviCRM’s payment processing
  • Profiles
  • Default values for the profile fields corresponding to the logged in user’s contact information
  • Customizable Ajax-fied confirmation and thank you panes
  • Utilizes the event’s settings such as “Is paid event?” etc..
  • Test or Live transactions
Field widget for the Event Edit Form

A “simple” field widget is provided by default for this module.  At the time of this writing, only the first price field can be edited via this widget.  

civicrm-entity-event-view-register.png

Getting Started

CiviCRM Entity and CiviCRM Entity Profile are dependencies for CiviCRM Entity Price Set Field. Go to the Drupal module page and enable all three modules and enable CiviCRM Entity Price Set Field, CiviCRM Entity, and CiviCRM Entity Profile.

Once enabled, you can add the Price Set Field to the Event Entity Type.

  • Go to the Event Manage Fields form at “/admin/structure/civicrm-entity/civicrm_event”
  • Scroll to the “Add New Field” section, enter a Label, and select the ‘CiviCRM Entity Price Set’ field type, for this example select the “Simple -- one price field” widget
  • There’s no special field or field instance settings, so just click save until you’re back to the Manage Fields page
  • Now go to the Manage Display Full Content form at “/admin/structure/civicrm-entity/civicrm_event/display/full
  • Set the new field to display
  • There is a field formatter setting to optionally submit test transactions
  • Pat yourself on the back, you’re setup to take registrations from the Drupal based Event view pages at /civicrm-event/[id]

Please note that the registration form takes into account the different settings on the CiviCRM Event.  For instance it will only enable CC transactions and render a billing block if the “Paid Event?” checkbox is checked. The form conforms to registration start and end dates, only renders if Online Registration is enabled.  The form checks to see if Max Participants has been reached, even when adding additional participants. Additional participants can only be added if “Allow Multiple Registrations” is enabled.

To learn more about registration form, how transactions work with the Contribution API, and how it can be customized, please continue reading on Skvare.com.

ToolsCiviCRMCiviEventDrupalExtensions

VanDUG April 2017 Meeting

Posted by Dale McGladdery - 2 May 2017 at 06:10 UTC

No more performance anxiety encore!

At our April 2017 meeting Renée Stephen gave the Vancouver Drupal User Group (VanDUG) an encore of her Pacific Northwest Drupal Summit (PNWDS) presentation: No more performance anxiety! The presentation walked us through the formal process of server load testing.

Renée's current gig as Technical Consultant at Acquia gives has given her lots of experience on the subject and she knows how to present. It's always a pleasure when someone deeply steeped in domain knowledge gives a great presentation.

I can't begin to summarize the entire presentation. Renée's slide-deck is available for download at the presentation description on the PNWDS website: No more performance anxiety: get your Drupal site tuned and ready to take the stage! Direct PDF link: PNWDS 2017 - No more performance anxiety.pdf

Here are the take-aways that surprised me:

  • The standard definition of load testing is backend server oriented and does not include front-end performance issues. For example, large hero images or JavaScript widget rendering. While these are important they are not part of this discipline and usually require different tool sets.
  • You'll want at least 2 days, possibly more, to familiarize yourself with jMeter.

I was also reminded of how much server and tool knowledge is required if you're the one doing the remediation. No single detail is exceedingly complicated but each technology in the stack has its particulars, tools, and metics.

Here are the tools Renée mentioned in her presentation:

Profiling Toolkit

  • Blazemeter Recorder
  • Postman
  • HAR
  • jMeter

Dynamic & Static Analysis

  • Blazemeter / jMeter
  • Apachebench (ab)
  • New Relic / TraceView / XHProf
  • WebPage Test
  • Chrome Inspector
  • Server logs and stats
  • varnishstat / varnishlog
  • Redis monitor / memcached-tool
  • Drupal Devel module WebProfiler

She also made a repo of her jMeter example files available at https://github.com/reinette/loadtest

A big thank you to Renée for presenting. I missed the presentation at PNWDS and was happy for the second change to see it.

Tagged:

My journey with the Webform module and the Drupal community

Posted by Jacob Rockowitz - 2 May 2017 at 03:13 UTC

I’ve decided to start a blog about my experience supporting the Webform module and working within the Drupal community and it begins here.

The reception I received at DrupalCon Baltimore, was, to say the least, overwhelming. My personal highlight was having Alex Pott, a Drupal 8 co-maintainer, sit in the front row of my Webform 8.x-5.x presentation. I couldn’t find the courage to approach him and say, "Hi". I’m sure we’ll laugh about this in the Webform module's issue queue.

 

My most important DrupalCon moment occurred to me after I finished my presentation and started taking questions; it was then that I realized how much impact my work is having in the Drupal community. At the same time, I got nervous. I asked myself, "How am I going to support this massive project?” The next day I got my answer at the Webform BOF, when Joseph Bachana asked "How can we help you?" and Tim Cosgrove created a #webform-dev Drupal Slack channel. I realized that help and support is available in the Drupal community.

 

Still, I have to admit that herding Drupal cats is not my strong point. I’m better at writing code than I am at writing words and managing issue queues. I’ve come to the realization that I write code to solve problems. Now, I’m starting a blog to inspire discussions. So I guess this first blog post of mine is my way of saying thanks for the supportive and memorable DrupalCon experience.

It’s time for me to get to work with the Drupal...Read More

State of Drupal presentation (April 2017)

Posted by Dries Buytaert - 1 May 2017 at 19:41 UTC
Drupal community

Last week, 3,271 people gathered at DrupalCon Baltimore to share ideas, to connect with friends and colleagues, and to collaborate on both code and community. It was a great event. One of my biggest takeaways from DrupalCon Baltimore is that Drupal 8's momentum is picking up more and more steam. There are now about 15,000 Drupal 8 sites launching every month.

I want to continue the tradition of sharing my State of Drupal presentations. You can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 24:00) or download a copy of my slides here (108 MB).



The first half of my presentation provided an overview of Drupal 8 updates. I discussed why Drupal is for ambitious digital experiences, how we will make Drupal upgrades easier and why we added four new Drupal 8 committers recently.

The second half of my keynote highlighted the newest improvements to Drupal 8.3, which was released less than a month ago. I showcased how an organization like The Louvre could use Drupal 8 to take advantage of new or improved site builder (layouts video, workflow video), content author (authoring video) and end user (BigPipe video, chatbot video) features.

I also shared that the power of Drupal lies in its ability to support the spectrum of both traditional websites and decoupled applications. Drupal continues to move beyond the page, and is equipped to support new user experiences and distribution platforms, such as conversational user interfaces. The ability to support any user experience is driving the community's emphasis on making Drupal API-first, not API-only.

Finally, it was really rewarding to spotlight several Drupalists that have made an incredible impact on Drupal. If you are interested in viewing each spotlight, they are now available on my YouTube channel.

Thanks to all who made DrupalCon Baltimore a truly amazing event. Every year, DrupalCon allows the Drupal community to come together to re-energize, collaborate and celebrate. Discussions on evolving Drupal's Code of Conduct and community governance were held and will continue to take place virtually after DrupalCon. If you have not yet had the chance, I encourage you to participate.

State of Drupal presentation (April 2017)

Posted by Dries Buytaert - 1 May 2017 at 19:41 UTC

Last week, 3,271 people gathered at DrupalCon Baltimore to share ideas, to connect with friends and colleagues, and to collaborate on both code and community. It was a great event. One of my biggest takeaways from DrupalCon Baltimore is that Drupal 8's momentum is picking up more and more steam. There are now about 15,000 Drupal 8 sites launching every month.

I want to continue the tradition of sharing my State of Drupal presentations. You can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 24:00) or download a copy of my slides here (108 MB).



The first half of my presentation provided an overview of Drupal 8 updates. I discussed why Drupal is for ambitious digital experiences, how we will make Drupal upgrades easier and why we added four new Drupal 8 committers recently.

The second half of my keynote highlighted the newest improvements to Drupal 8.3, which was released less than a month ago. I showcased how an organization like The Louvre could use Drupal 8 to take advantage of new or improved site builder (layouts video, workflow video), content author (authoring video) and end user (BigPipe video, chatbot video) features.

I also shared that the power of Drupal lies in its ability to support the spectrum of both traditional websites and decoupled applications. Drupal continues to move beyond the page, and is equipped to support new user experiences and distribution platforms, such as conversational user interfaces. The ability to support any user experience is driving the community's emphasis on making Drupal API-first, not API-only.

Finally, it was really rewarding to spotlight several Drupalists that have made an incredible impact on Drupal. If you are interested in viewing each spotlight, they are now available on my YouTube channel.

Thanks to all who made DrupalCon Baltimore a truly amazing event. Every year, DrupalCon allows the Drupal community to come together to re-energize, collaborate and celebrate. Discussions on evolving Drupal's Code of Conduct and community governance were held and will continue to take place virtually after DrupalCon. If you have not yet had the chance, I encourage you to participate.

Angular Contributor's Day at ngconf

Posted by Mediacurrent - 1 May 2017 at 13:29 UTC
Angular Contributor’s Day at ngconf

On Saturday, April 9th, as most of the attendees of ngconf were catching flights home, a group of the core Angular team from Google and prominent community members came together for a Contributor’s Day discussion organized by ThisDot. The stated goal was to discuss areas where the core team and community could better support each other and help advance adoption and ease of entry into using Angular.

Drupal 8 core release window on Wednesday, May 03, 2017

Posted by Drupal core announcements - 1 May 2017 at 13:19 UTC
Start:  2017-05-02 12:00 - 2017-05-04 12:00 UTC Organizers:  catch cilefen xjm Event type:  Online meeting (eg. IRC meeting)

The monthly core patch (bug fix) release window is this Wednesday, May 03. Drupal 8.3.2 will be released with dozens of fixes for Drupal 8. There will be no Drupal 7 bugfix release this month.

To ensure a reliable release window for the patch release, there will be a Drupal 8.3.x commit freeze from 12:00 UTC Tuesday to 12:00 UTC Thursday. Now is a good time to update your development/staging servers to the latest 8.3.x-dev code and help us catch any regressions in advance. If you do find any regressions, please report them in the issue queue. Thanks!

To see all of the latest changes that will be included in the release, see the 8.3.x commit log.

Other upcoming core release windows after this week include:

  • Wednesday, May 17 (security release window)
  • Wednesday, June 07 (patch release window)
  • Wednesday, October 5 (scheduled minor release)

For more information on Drupal core release windows, see the documentation on release timing and security releases, as well as the Drupal core release cycle overview.

What is Drupal?

Posted by Tim Millwood - 30 Apr 2017 at 11:28 UTC
What is Drupal?

In his keynote at DrupalCon Baltimore 2017, Dries talked for some time about how Drupal is now for Ambitious Digital Experiences. There has been a lot of talk over the last few years, especially since Drupal 8 was release, that Drupal is now an enterprise CMS. With this keynote it seems as though Dries is, in a way, acknowledging this. Ambitious Digital Experiences reads as something more complex than a blog, a brochure site, or sites for SMEs.

With this in mind, and recent discussions about the Future of Drupal, maybe it's time to put together a sort overview of where we are and what we have in Drupal.

Drupal 8 took nearly 5 years to develop and had over 4,000 people contribute code to it. There are now 11 core committers for Drupal 8, with a further 3 committers tasked with Drupal 7. Listed in MAINTAINERS.txt are over 60 subsystem maintainers who oversee the development of parts of Drupal known as "subsystems".

When downloading Drupal 8 the majority of the code sites within the core directory, and from there is split into a number of distinct parts. There are 22 Drupal components, which are independent libraries and don't depend on anything else within Drupal, there are all available via github. On top of are over 70 base subsystems, these may depend on components or other base subsystems, but don't depend on any modules. Finally there's over 70 modules, 5 themes, and 2 profiles, these may depend on any other parts of Drupal core. From these modules there are 12 that are (or were) experimental, experimental modules are here to add new functionality into core for testing purposes, but not yet fully supported.

The documentation for Drupal core is pretty awesome, and well worth a read for those looking for more information on the governance, "gate", or development workflow.

timmillwood Sun, 30/04/2017 - 12:28 Tags drupal-planet drupal drupal core Add new comment

What is Drupal?

Posted by Tim Millwood - 30 Apr 2017 at 11:28 UTC
What is Drupal?

In his keynote at DrupalCon Baltimore 2017, Dries talked for some time about how Drupal is now for Ambitious Digital Experiences. There has been a lot of talk over the last few years, especially since Drupal 8 was release, that Drupal is now an enterprise CMS. With this keynote it seems as though Dries is, in a way, acknowledging this. Ambitious Digital Experiences reads as, something more complex than a blog, a brochure site, or sites for SMEs.

With this in mind, and recent discussions about the Future of Drupal, maybe it's time to take a look at where we are and what we have in Drupal.

Drupal 8 took nearly 5 years to develop and had over 4,000 people contribute code to it. There are now 11 core committers for Drupal 8, with a further 3 committers tasked with Drupal 7. Listed in MAINTAINERS.txt are over 60 subsystem maintainers who oversee the development of parts of Drupal known as "subsystems".

When downloading Drupal 8 the majority of the code sites within the core directory, and from there is split into a number of distinct parts. There are 22 Drupal components, which are independent libraries and don't depend on anything else within Drupal, there are all available via github. On top of are over 70 base subsystems, these may depend on components or other base subsystems, but don't depend on any modules. Finally there's over 70 modules, 5 themes, and 2 profiles, these may depend on any other parts of Drupal core. From these modules there are 12 that are (or were) experimental, experimental modules are here to add new functionality into core for testing purposes, but not yet fully supported.

The documentation for Drupal core is pretty awesome, and well worth a read for those looking for more information on the governance, "gate", or development workflow.

timmillwood Sun, 30/04/2017 - 12:28 Tags drupal-planet drupal drupal core Add new comment

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