National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Posted by Drupal.org Featured Case Studies on April 17, 2015 at 6:30pm
National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum website on tablet and mobile phonesCompleted Drupal site or project URL: http://www.baseballhall.org/

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum (BHoF) is an American institution. For 75 years they have housed the archive of America's favorite game, welcoming new inductees each year and connecting generations with their huge love and knowledge of the sport.

BHoF has a large and dedicated audience, but their location in Central New York limits the number of physical visits to the museum. To reach a wider audience, they needed to unlock the full potential of their online presence.

Cogapp helps organizations use digital media, specializing in large-scale, mission-critical projects for prominent institutions.

BHoF appointed Cogapp to perform a discovery phase to research user engagement, the kinds of content that are of interest to users, and key value propositions of the website to its visitors. This work then fed into developing the site, with the central objective being to showcase the vast number of artifacts in the Hall's collection, creating connections that bring these objects to life for site visitors.

Key modules/theme/distribution used: Islandora Imagecache ExternalParagraphsEntity APIMetatagFeaturesStrongarmMasterVarnish HTTP Accelerator IntegrationOrganizations involved: CogappTeam members: alxbridgechapabutassos

VIDEO: DrupalCon Amsterdam Interview: Angie Byron

Posted by Drupal Watchdog on April 17, 2015 at 4:59pm

Angie Byron is Director of Community Development at Acquia. For this interview, during the final day of DrupalCon Amsterdam, we were able to find an empty auditorium. Alas, filming with my brand-new GoPro camera, we got off to a topsy-turvy start...

RONNIE RAY: I’ve had you upside down.

ANGIE BYRON: Oh hahaha!

I go by Angie Byron or webchick, and more people know me as webchick than Angie Byron.

Today, what I love to do at DrupalCons, on the last day of the sprint days, is just walk around all the tables and see what everyone is working on, cause there’s hundreds of people here and they’re all sort of scratching their own itches on everything from Drupal-dot-org to, like, what is the newest coolest content staging thing gonna be?, to how are we going to get Drupal 8 done?

And everybody working together and collaborating with people they don’t get to see all the time, it’s a lot of fun for me.

I feel like we made a lot of really great decisions about the Drupal 8 release management stuff here that we’ll be able to put into practice, and help try and focus efforts on getting the critical issues resolved, trying to clean up the loose ends that we still have, and getting the release out the door faster.

And the other thing I’m going to work on for the next month is something called Drupal Module Upgrader, which is the script that can help contrib modules port their modules to Drupal 8. It automates a lot of that task.

Now that Beta is here it’s a great time for people to update their modules, so I want to work on tools to help facilitate that.

RR: What are you reading, besides books on Drupal?

AB: Not much. Although I love reading kids books, because I have a daughter who’s 16 months now and she loves to be read to. So my latest books I’ve been reading are Where is the Green Sheep? and Go, Dog, Go! and a bunch of Richard Scarry stuff and things like that because she loves to know what everything’s called. She loves books.

There’s a Dr. Seuss book called Oh, The Places You’ll Go! That book is dark, man, that is like a dark book. It’s entertaining. I remember it from when I was a kid but I don’t remember it like that!

RR: Music?

AB: I listen to a lot of old music cause I’m one of those curmudgeonly people who thinks the best music was already made. So, like I’ve been having like a ‘70s rock, ‘80s pop, ‘90s punk rock, like – that’s sort of what’s in my chain all the time. Hair metal, junk like that. How to relive my kid-age stuff.

I think the community has grown to such an enormous size now that I guess one thing I wonder about, – not really worry about– but am curious about, is if can we still maintain that small-knit community feel that we had back when I started, when we were 70 people at a DrupalCon – not the 2,500 people we have now.

It’s cool to kind of walk around DrupalCon, especially on a sprint day, especially because I feel we have retained that – and people are finding people to connect with and cool things to work on and stuff like that.

I think it’s something we all need to collectively be intentional about is, you know, it’s not just enough that Drupal is just a great software project, it’s also about the people and trying to maintain that welcome feeling – that got us all in the door – for generations to come.

So that’s something I would leave as a parting note.

Tags:  DrupalCon DrupalCon Amsterdam Video Video: 

Tag1 Spotlight: Nedjo Rogers

Posted by Tag1 Consulting on April 17, 2015 at 4:24pm

Presentation: Drupal 8 Module Development

Posted by Chapter Three on April 17, 2015 at 4:15pm

This session was presented at Bay Area Drupal Camp, San Diego Drupal Camp, Phoenix Drupal Camp, and Stanford Drupal Camp.



Have you written a few simple modules for Drupal 7, and are a little bit nervous to find out the changes you'll be facing in Drupal 8?

Speeding up Complex Drupal Data Loads with Custom Caches

Posted by Aten Design Group on April 17, 2015 at 3:27pm

Recently we had the task of loading data from a content type with 350 fields. Each node is a University’s enrollment data for one year by major, gender, minority, and a number of other categories. CSV exports of this data obviously became problematic. Even before we got to 350 fields, with the overhead of the Views module we would hit PHP timeouts when exporting all the nodes. If you’re not familiar with Drupal's database structure, each field’s data is stored in a table named ‘field_data_FIELDNAME’. Loading an entire node means JOINing the node table by entity_id with each related field table. When a node only has a handful of fields, those JOINs work fine, but at 350 fields the query runs slow.

On this site we’re also plotting some of the data using highcharts.js. We really hit a wall when trying to generate aggregate data to plot alongside a single university's. This meant loading every node of this content type to calculate the averages, which turned our slow query into a very slow query. We even hit a limit on the number of database JOINs that can be done at one time.

In retrospect this is a perfect case for a custom entity, but we already had thousands of nodes in the existing content type. Migrating them and implementing a custom entity was no longer a good use of time. Instead, we added a custom table that keeps all the single value fields in a serialized string.

The table gets defined with a hook_schema in our module's .install file:

function ncwit_charts_schema() {
 
  $schema['ncwit_charts_inst_data'] = array(
    'description' => 'Table for serialized institution data.',
    'fields' => array(
      'nid' => array(
        'type' => 'int',
        'default' => 0,
        'not null' => TRUE,
        'description' => 'node id for this row',
      ),
      'tid' => array(
        'type' => 'int',
        'default' => 0,
        'not null' => TRUE,
        'description' => 'intitution term id that this data belongs to',
      ),
      'year' => array(
        'type' => 'int',
        'default' => 0,
        'not null' => TRUE,
        'description' => 'school year for this node',
      ),
      'data' => array(
        'type' => 'blob',
        'not null' => FALSE,
        'size' => 'big',
        'serialize' => TRUE,
        'description' => 'A serialized array of name value pairs that store the field data for a survey data node.',
      ),
    ),
    'primary key' => array('nid'),
  );
 
  return $schema;
}

The most important part of the array is 'data' with type 'blob', which can be up to 65kB. Not shown is another array to create a table for our aggregate data.

When a new node is saved hook_node_insert() is invoked. hook_node_update() fires both when a new node is saved and when it's updated.

/**
 *  Implements hook_node_insert().
 *  save serialized field data to inst_data table for a new node
 *  For a new node, have to use this
 */
function ncwit_charts_node_insert($node) {
  ncwit_charts_serialize_save($node);
}
 
 
/**
 *  Implements hook_node_update().
 *  save serialized field data to inst_data table
 */
function ncwit_charts_node_update($node) {
  if (isset($node->nid)) {
    // we're also calling this function from hook_node_insert
    // because hook_node_update doesn't have the nid if is a new node
    ncwit_charts_serialize_save($node);
  }
  else {
    return;
  }
}

Now we actually process the fields to be serialized and store. This section will vary greatly depending on your fields.

function ncwit_charts_serialize_save($node) {
  // save each value as a simple key => value item
  foreach ($node as $key => $value) {
    $data[$key] = $value[LANGUAGE_NONE][0]['value'];
  }
 
  $fields = array();
  $fields['nid'] = $node->nid;
  $fields['tid'] = $node->field_institution_term[LANGUAGE_NONE][0]['tid'];
  $fields['year'] = $node->field_school_year[LANGUAGE_NONE][0]['value'];
  $fields['data'] = serialize($data);
 
  db_merge('ncwit_charts_inst_data')
    ->key(array(
      'nid' => $node->nid,
    ))
    ->fields($fields)
    ->execute();

When a node is deleted we have some clean-up to do.

/**
 *  Implements hook_node_delete().
 *  Also remove node's data from inst_data
 */
function ncwit_charts_node_delete($node) {
  if ($node->type !== 'data_survey') {
    //only care about data_survey nodes
    return;
  }
 
  $query = db_select('ncwit_charts_inst_data', 'i');
  $query->fields('i')->condition('i.nid', $node->nid);
  $result = $query->execute();
  $data = $result->fetchAssoc();
  if ($data > 0) {
    db_delete('ncwit_charts_inst_data')->condition('nid', $node->nid)->execute();
  }
}

When first installed or when fields get changed, we added a batch process that re-saves the serialized strings. Aggregate data is calculated during cron and saved in another table. Rather than loading every node with JOINs, the data comes from a simple query of this custom table.

Pulling the data out of the database and calling unserialize() gives us a simple associative array of the data. To pass this data to highcharts.js we have a callback defined that returns the arrays encoded as JSON. Obviously this gets more complicated when dealing with multiple languages or multi-value fields. But in our case almost everything is a simple integer.

This process of caching our nodes as serialized data changed our loading speed from painfully slow to almost instant. If you run into similar challenges, hopefully this approach will help you too.

Thoughts on the Acquia Certified Developer - Front End Specialist Exam

Posted by Midwestern Mac, LLC on April 16, 2015 at 8:34pm

Previously, I posted my thoughts on the Acquia Certified Developer - Back End Specialist exam as well as my thoughts on the Certified Developer exam. To round out the trifecta of developer-oriented exams, I took the Front End Specialist exam this morning, and am posting some observations for those interested in taking the exam.

Acquia Certified Developer - Front End Specialist badge

My Theming Background

I started my Drupal journey working on design/theme-related work, and the first few Drupal themes I built were in the Drupal 5 days (I inherited some 4.7 sites, but I only really started learning how Drupal's front end worked in Drupal 5+). Luckily for me, a lot of the basics have remained the same (or at least similar) from 5-7.

For the past couple years, though, I have shied away from front end work, only doing as much as I need to keep building out features on sites like Hosted Apache Solr and Server Check.in, and making all my older Drupal sites responsive (and sometimes, mobile-first) to avoid penalization in Google's search rankings... and to build a more usable web :)

Sites that Cannot Fail -- Forecasting the Big Storm

Posted by Acquia on April 16, 2015 at 7:04pm

storm.jpg

Sometimes we can’t plan for it. Sometimes we have a moment’s notice. Other times it’s our most anticipated day of the year. No matter the situation, every organization has experienced a time when their digital properties could not fail—or the business impact would be devastating.

In this blog series, we’re showcasing what it meant for three of our largest customers to have a site that could not fail. We’ll highlight both business and technical preparation, continuous improvements, platform insights, and the importance of always listening to those providing feedback on the experience.

The Story

The Weather Channel’s weather.com, one of the top 20 most trafficked sites in the US, provides millions of people every day with the world's best weather forecasts, content, and data. On average, it serves 15 million page views per day to 30 million unique visitors per month. But when major weather events loom, like a hurricane or nor’easter, the site will serve up to a billion requests a week.

These requests include delivering hundreds of dynamic maps and streaming video to users in over three million forecast locations. The site has to remain stable with instantaneous page loads and 100 percent uptime, despite these bad weather traffic bumps of up to 300 percent.

The Weather Channel’s legacy platform was groaning under this pressure. It was using approximately 144 servers across three data centers to deliver more than 17,000 articles updated on a minute-by-minute basis.
So in November 2014, weather.com moved its entire website, which serves more than 20 million pages of content, to Drupal and the Acquia Platform, facilitated by the experts at Acquia partner MediaCurrent.

Within weeks, one of the nastiest winters on record began moving into the Midwest and Northeastern part of the US. Prodigious web traffic followed.

The new site, now the busiest Drupal site in the world, never buckled. In fact, it thrived, delivering faster, more efficiently cached pages to customers.

“weather.com is thinking ahead to a future where up-to-the-minute weather information requires an open delivery platform that adapts to fast changes in technology,” Tom Erickson, CEO, Acquia, said at the time. “The Weather Channel is leading the transformation of how we interact with weather news; people expect accurate weather forecasts on-demand, and they want to be alerted to events that may impact their life, work, travel, and leisure. weather.com is gaining the agility to deliver on customers’ increasing expectations. It’s leading the charge with contextual weather insight that anticipates every user’s needs.”

A recent global survey of more than 500 businesses for the Reducing Customer Struggle report found that companies are losing nearly a quarter of their annual online revenue due to a bad website experience. That’s billions of dollars lost and customers who won’t come back because of a digital experience that left a bad impression.

Whether you’re a weather site watching traffic rise with the barometric pressure, an enterprise facing transformation in an industry where digital transformation is lacking, or a smaller brand on the cusp of breaking into a new market, your digital presence can’t fail.

Dave Terry, co-founder and partner of client services at Mediacurrent, said, “Acquia opens up all kinds of opportunities for weather.com. The site relies heavily on the ability to quickly create and distribute massive amounts of content, and with Drupal, weather.com gains editorial agility and the ability to innovate and bring the latest applications and features to the user experience.”

Behind the Scenes

When it comes to capacity planning, some organizations plan for a worst-case scenario. They purchase larger-than-necessary capacity to be permanently available. But this is wasted money. Conversely, some organizations under-plan for traffic. Without the means to increase capacity on demand, they suffer outages and, ultimately, loss of revenue.

With Acquia Cloud, the guesswork is eliminated. You only pay for what you need. Acquia Cloud scales with burstable and elastic resources, which can be added quickly and easily on demand. Our operations team can scale up resources for any period of time, and then return resources back to normal levels when traffic subsides.

We know that scaling is complex, so we do the work for you. We add resources in real time to address changing traffic conditions seamlessly when a site needs it most. Scaling on Acquia Cloud does not require risky architectural changes like migrations and resizing. But we do scale the ecosystem, not just the hardware. We scale across all layers of the environment––web servers, file systems, databases, and load balancers. The architecture scales across the MySQL database layer using data replication and the file system layer utilizing GlusterFS to ensure syncing. The web server layer is scaled up by running active web servers in multiple availability zones. We run dedicated Memcached servers for sites with high workloads and multiple load balancers to ensure traffic is distributed. This level of Drupal-aware customization doesn't exist outside of Acquia.

scaling-image.png

As part of the scaling enablement strategy, it is important for customers to have a site insulation strategy so that visitors are not aware of traffic increases. Acquia uses Varnish caching in front of all traffic to speed up sites. Additional features such as geolocation, mobile redirection, and CDN implementation can be enabled. Acquia has over 25 personnel across our Professional Services, Technical Account Management, and Support organizations who specialize in performance, focusing load testing, database query rewriting, stack tracing, and more.

At Acquia, our passion is customer success. Because of that, your site doesn’t become the next headline. Your best day doesn’t become your worst; your biggest events are uneventful behind the scenes. In essence, we don’t sleep, so you can. Our team of experts is on hand 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year so that you don’t fail. You get a true partnership with Acquia.

No matter the time of day, or the size of the traffic spike, we have your back. So instead of downtime, your traffic spikes yield growth and success.

photo: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Tags:  web platform drupal acquia drupal planet

Is Your Site Ready For Google’s New Search Ranking Algorithm?

Posted by Achieve Internet Blog on April 16, 2015 at 6:35pm

How does mobile-friendliness affect Google search rankings?

Google reports:

Adding panels support to the Reply module

Posted by A Dev From The Plains on April 16, 2015 at 6:11pm

One of the major disadvantages of entities in Drupal 7, is the lack of support for built-in comments. This is due to the model of the core comments module, which is heavily tied to nodes -node comments are essentially settings of each content type-, and not available for other entity types. In Drupal 8 this has changed already, and comments are considered fields that can be attached to any entity type.

For Drupal 7, in the meantime, there’s been a similar solution for a while, which is the reply module. The reply module leverages the Entity API to define a “reply” entity type, and offers a UI to create “reply” bundles. Then, via the Field API, you can add a “Reply” field to any entity type, choosing the reply bundle that should be used by that particular field. The flexibility that gives is huge, since it means that you’re not restricted to just a comment type for your application.

I’ve been using it in a project for some time, and have to say the module works pretty well, although there’s not an official stable release yet. One of the problems I came across when I started to use it, was the lack of support for the panels module, so I decided to write a ctools “content_type” plugin to add that support myself. Here is the process I followed.

First, let ctools know where the ctools plugins live:

/**
 * Implements hook_ctools_plugin_directory()
 */
function reply_ctools_plugin_directory($module, $plugin) {
  if ($module == 'ctools') {
    return 'plugins/' . $plugin;
  }
}

Then, create the plugin in the relevant folder. Let’s name it reply_add_form. Following the code above, in this case it would be under “{module_folder}/plugins/content_types/reply_add_form”. Let’s have a look at the $plugin declaration array:

/**
 * Plugins are described by creating a $plugin array which will be used
 * by the system that includes this file.
 */
$plugin = array(
  'single' => TRUE,
  'title' => t('Reply - Add form'),
  'description' => t('Form to add a new reply to an Entity'),
  'category' => t('Reply'),
  'defaults' => array(),
  'render callback' => 'reply_add_form_content_type_render',
  'edit form' => array(
    'reply_add_form_select_entity_type' => t('Reply form - Entity Type'),
    'reply_add_form_select_reply_field' => t('Reply form - Reply Field'),
  ),
  'required context' => array(
    new ctools_context_required(t('Entity being viewed'), 'any'),
  ),
);

No magic in there if you’re familiar with ctools (if you aren’t, you can install the advanced_help module, which has plenty of documentation on how to create your own ctools plugins). One point to highlight, is the fact that the plugin has two edit forms instead of one: in the first one, we’ll choose the entity type for which we’re adding the form, and in the second one, we’ll choose the reply field used, from the available within the selected entity type (could be more than one).

Also, note that the required context bit is accepting “any” context available within the panels page. I had to do it that way because, unlike with nodes, it’s impossible to know in advance all the entity types that will be available in the system how the user will name the arguments and contexts in panels and offer just the relevant options. Instead, all contexts are accepted, and the user (which will be usually a developer or a site-builder, anyway), is responsible for choosing the right one in the settings form.

Let’s have a look at the settings forms:

/**
 * Returns an edit form for custom type settings.
 */
function reply_add_form_select_entity_type($form, &$form_state) {
  $entities = entity_get_info();
  $options = array();

  // Get all existing entities.
  foreach ($entities as $entity_type => $entity) {
    $options[$entity_type] = $entity['label'];
  }

  $form['config']['reply_entity_type'] = array(
    '#type' => 'select',
    '#title' => t('Entity Type'),
    '#options' => $options,
    '#default_value' => isset($form_state['conf']['reply_entity_type']) ? $form_state['conf']['reply_entity_type'] : NULL,
  );
  return $form;
}

/**
 * Returns an edit form for custom type settings.
 */
function reply_add_form_select_reply_field($form, &$form_state) {
  $options = array();
  // Get entity type chosen in previous step.
  $entity_type = $form_state['conf']['reply_entity_type'];

  // Get all the field instances for the given entity type, and add the 'reply'
  // ones as options.
  $field_map = field_info_field_map();
  $reply_fields = array_filter($field_map, '_reply_add_form_filter_reply_fields');

  foreach ($reply_fields as $field_name => $fields_info) {
    if (!empty($fields_info['bundles'][$entity_type])) {
      $options[$field_name] = $field_name;
    }
  }

  $form['config']['reply_field'] = array(
    '#type' => 'select',
    '#title' => t('Reply field'),
    '#options' => $options,
    '#default_value' => isset($form_state['conf']['reply_field']) ? $form_state['conf']['reply_field'] : NULL,
  );
  return $form;
}

/**
 * Submit handler for the custom type settings form.
 */
function reply_add_form_select_entity_type_submit($form, &$form_state) {
  $form_state['conf'] = array_merge($form_state['conf'], array_filter($form_state['values']));
}

/**
 * Submit handler for the custom type settings form.
 */
function reply_add_form_select_reply_field_submit($form, &$form_state) {
  reply_add_form_select_entity_type_submit($form, $form_state);
}

Pretty simple stuff. As mentioned, the first one allows to select the entity type for which the reply form will be added. The second one, gets a simple map containing all the fields in the system, filters them out to keep only reply fields, and then filters them out again to show only the ones available for the entity type selected in the first settings form. The forms look like this:

reply_add_form_settings_1 reply_add_form_settings_2

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, the render function, which simply takes care of loading the entity passed in the plugin config, and calls the appropriate function of the reply module, to let it create the reply form.

/**
 * Output function for the 'reply_add_form' content type.
 */
function reply_add_form_content_type_render($subtype, $conf, $panel_args, $context) {
  if (!$context[0]->data) {
    return;
  }
  $entity = $context[0]->data;
  $reply_field_instance = field_info_instance($conf['reply_entity_type'], $conf['reply_field'], $conf['reply_entity_type']);

  $block = new stdClass();
  $block->title = '';

  $form_options = array(
    'entity_id' => $entity->identifier(),
    'instance_id' => $reply_field_instance['id'],
  );
  $output = drupal_get_form('reply_form', (object) $form_options);

  $block->content = array(
    '#markup' => render($output),
  );
  return $block;
}

I’ve uploaded the plugin file as a gist to github, so you can download it from here. Also, it’s worth noting that there’s an issue in the issue queue of the reply module to get the panels support implemented, with this plugin supplied as a patch, so hopefully you won’t need to keep it as a separate plugin, as it should make it into the next alpha release soon, and in the dev branch in the next few days.

Drupal is fun to use - meet Karen Grey

Posted by Acquia on April 16, 2015 at 4:49pm
Language Undefined Drupal is more fun - meet Karen Grey

I sat down with Karen Grey at Drupal Camp Brighton 2015 to find out more about who she is and what she does with Drupal. I apologize for taking her out of the code sprints for that time! Since we spoke, Karen has taken on a position as Senior Drupal Developer at i-KOS in their Brighton office.

RESTful Web Services Module Basics

Posted by Drupal Watchdog on April 16, 2015 at 3:30pm
Article

 String Telephone Drupal 7 does not have built-in support for representational state transfer (REST) functionality. However, the RESTful Web Services module is arguably the most efficient way to provide resource representations for all the entity types, by leveraging Drupal's powerful Entity API. Unmodified, the module makes it possible to output the instances of the core entity types – node, file, and user – in JSON or XML format. Further entity type resources and formats are possible utilizing hooks in added code.

As with any REST solution, the RESTful Web Services module supports all four of the fundamental operations of data manipulation: create, read, update, and delete (CRUD). The corresponding RESTful API HTTP methods are POST, GET, PUT, and DELETE, respectively.

Anyone hoping to learn and make use of this module – especially for the first time – will likely be frustrated by the current project documentation, which is incomplete, uneven, and lacking clear examples. This article – a brief overview – is intended to introduce what is possible with this module, and help anyone getting started with it.

We begin with a clean Drupal 7 installation (using the Standard profile) running on a virtual host with the domain name "drupal_7_test". After installing and enabling the module, we find that it does not have the configuration user interface one might expect. In the demonstration code below, we focus on the node entity type.

Nabbing a Node

The simplest operation – reading an entity instance – is performed using a simple GET request containing the machine name of the entity type and the entity's ID.

We Love Our Volunteers!

Posted by Drupal Association News on April 16, 2015 at 2:15pm

Volunteers sprintingThis week is National Volunteer Week, a week to recognize that volunteerism is a building block to a strong and thriving community.  The Drupal Community is no different: as an open-source project our volunteers are vital to the health and growth of our project.  There are so many roles and levels of contribution within our Drupal ecosystem that we at the Drupal Association wanted to highlight how much your contribution means to us and our work.  I took some time and asked around, here’s some of the glowing praise our staff has to say about our phenomenal volunteers. 

Amanda Gonser“I am continually impressed with the volunteers that I get to work with.  Not only do they rock at their jobs, but they are so dedicated to the work that they do for Drupal and the Cons specifically!  Anyone who has volunteered for a Con knows that it is a large undertaking, and a responsibility that isn't taken lightly. These volunteers come back each week with positive attitudes, valuable ideas and great results.  Although I have only been at the Association for a little over six months, I can truly say that these volunteers are what gives our Cons the 'special sauce' and I am lucky to get to work with volunteers from around the globe on a daily basis.” 

- Amanda Gosner, DrupalCon Coordinator

Holly Ross“Most of my day is spent with Drupal Association staff, who have the luxury of getting paid to think about Drupal for 8 hours a day. A good chunk of my job is working with volunteers though-- the Board of Directors, Drupal.org Working Groups, Community Organizers, DrupalCon session speakers. So many of you give so much of your time and your smarts back to the project and the community, and it's my privilege and duty to learn from you all.”

- Holly Ross, Executive Director

Neil Drumm"I look forward to working working with community volunteers to help build and improve Drupal.org. The site would not be where it is today without everyone's work."

- Neil Drumm, Drupal.org Lead Architect

 

Megan Sanicki“I want to thank Cathy and Jared for being my sprint mentor at DrupalCon Latin America. I made my first comment on the issue queue. It felt so good to cross into that world finally, even if it is was just a baby toe crossing over.”

- Megan Sanicki, COO

 

Leigh Carver“It feels like I’m hearing news every day about the amazing programs our community members put together all over the world — from Los Angeles to Uganda and beyond. Without help from amazing community volunteers who donate time working on social media, in the issue queues, or even volunteers who take a brief moment to drop a note in my inbox (“have you seen this?”), these stories would never be shared with our wider community.” 

- Leigh Carver, Content Writer

Today, we invite you to take a few minutes to recognize your fellow Drupal contributors by tweeting or sending a message via IRC to appreciate each other.  After all, without our volunteers, our Drupal Community would not be as lively, bright, and welcoming.  Want to lend a hand?  Our get involved page has plenty of ways to volunteer with the project.

Drupal 7 - Hooking Ajax events and views refresh

Posted by KnackForge on April 16, 2015 at 1:40pm
Drupal has a solid Ajax interface, we can hook into the Ajax events at various places. I will explain some 5 important methods,   1) beforeSerialize - called before data is packed and runs before the beforeSend & beforeSubmit 2) beforeSubmit - called before the ajax request 3) beforeSend - called just before the ajax request 4) success - called after ajax event returns data 5) complete - called after the request ends   Lets say you want to capture some ajax event (in built or made by other module) to do some event like Views refresh. We can use a very simple logic to do that.  

Prototyping LinkForward with Drupal, a startup case study

Posted by Pronovix on April 16, 2015 at 1:10pm

This is the story of how I built a first prototype for LinkForward, a web application for power networkers, and how I built it in record time using Drupal (12 hours), without a single line of custom code.

Drush for Developers Second Edition

Posted by Cruiskeen Consulting on April 15, 2015 at 9:53pm

Almost everyone who does any form of Drupal development uses Drush - it's the Swiss Army Knife of the Drupal world. Drush is the Drupal Shell, and it lets you do a whole lot of amazing things with Drupal sites without actually going to the site, logging in, and clicking buttons.  It's a command-line tool (and since I'm an old UNIX hand, it's just right for me.

Despite the fact that we all use Drush, it's pretty clear that some of us use it better than others. I'm often really impressed with seeing someone else use it effectively, with powerful aliases, and doing workflow things with drush that I could hardly imagine. And let's face it, we can't always have a mentor at hand.

This book, Drush for Developers Second Edition,  can be your mentor. It's a pretty quick read (a little over 150 pages) as technical books go. It covers a lot of territory along the way, though.  As all these books seem to do, it starts out with installing Drush on your server, and then moves forward into using it.  Though I've been using Drush for some time now, I never have quite been able to grasp the more advanced uses, like using Drush to move code and features from development to test to production, for example.  This book give a really good idea of how to do some of those functions.

Drupal for Developers Second Edition

Posted by Cruiskeen Consulting on April 15, 2015 at 9:53pm

Almost everyone who does any form of Drupal development uses Drush - it's the Swiss Army Knife of the Drupal world. Drush is the Drupal Shell, and it lets you do a whole lot of amazing things with Drupal sites without actually going to the site, logging in, and clicking buttons.  It's a command-line tool (and since I'm an old UNIX hand, it's just right for me.

A new way to welcome newcomers on Drupal.org

Posted by Drupal.org frontpage posts for the Drupal planet on April 15, 2015 at 8:04pm

The first initiative on the Drupal.org 2015 roadmap is ‘Better account creation and login’. One of the listed goals for that initiative is “Build a user engagement path which will guide users from fresh empty accounts to active contributors, identifying and preventing spammers from moving further.” This is something Drupal Association team has been focusing on in the last few weeks.

The first change we rolled out a few days ago was a ‘new’ indicator on comments from users whose Drupal.org accounts are fewer than 90 days old. The indicator is displayed on their profile page as well. We hope this will help make conversations in the issue queues and forum comments more welcoming, as people will be able to easily see that someone is new, and probably doesn’t know yet a lot about the way community works.

Today we are taking another step towards making Drupal.org more welcoming environment for new users. But first, a bit of background.

New users and spam

It is not a surprise for anyone that a big number of user accounts registering on the site are spam accounts. To fight that and prevent spam content from appearing on Drupal.org, we have a number of different tools in place. Of course, we don’t want these tools to affect all active, honest users of the site, and make their daily experience more difficult. To separate users we are sure about from those we aren’t sure about yet, we have a special ‘confirmed’ user role.

All new users start without such a role. Their content submissions are checked by Honeypot and Mollom, their profiles are not visible to anonymous visitors of the site, and the types of content they may create are limited. Once a user receives a ‘confirmed’ role, his or her submissions will not be checked by spam fighting tools anymore; their profile page will be visible to everyone, and they will be able to create more different types of content on the site.

This system works pretty well, and our main goal is to ensure that valid new users get the ‘confirmed’ role as quickly as possible, to improve their experience and enable them to fully participate on the site.

The best way to identify someone as not a spammer is have another human look at the content they post and confirm they are not spammers. Previously, we had a very limited number of people who could do that-- about 50. Because of that, it usually took quite some time for new user to get the role. This was especially noticeable during sprints.

Today we’d like to open a process of granting a ‘confirmed’ role to the thousands of active users on the site.

‘Community’ user role

Today, we are introducing a new ‘Community’ role on the site. It will be granted automatically to users who have been around for some time and reached a certain level of participation on Drupal.org. Users who have this role will be able to ‘confirm’ new users on the site. They will see a small button on comments and user profile of any user who has not yet been confirmed. If you are one of the users with ‘Community’ role, look out for this new Confirm button, and when you see one next to a user - take another look at what the person posted. If their content looks valid, just click ‘confirm’. By doing so, you will empower new users to fully participate on Drupal.org and improve their daily experience on the site.

With expect to have at least 10,000 active users with the ‘Community’ role. With so many people to grant the ‘confirmed’ role, new users should be confirmed faster than ever before.

If you aren’t sure if you have the ‘community’ role or not, don’t worry. We will send an email notification to every user whose account receives the new role. The email will have all the information about the role and how to use it.

Thanks for helping us make Drupal.org a better place!

Front page news: Planet Drupal

VIDEO: DrupalCon Amsterdam Interview: MortenDK

Posted by Drupal Watchdog on April 15, 2015 at 5:39pm

On a sunny Amsterdam morning, we catch Morten (Tag1 Consulting, Geek Röyale) as he speeds through DrupalCon’s RAI Convention Center on an urgent Viking mission. We waylay him long enough for this brief, Danish-accented, rapid-fire chit-chat.

MORTEN: I am Morten, also known as MortenDK.

RONNIE RAY: You gave a talk this morning?

MORTEN: Yes, I gave a talk about the Drupal 8 Twig project, which is the new theming layer for Drupal. And I gave a demo on all the new and exciting things we have in it.

So that was really good to show off from a front-ender’s perspective everything that was done over the last couple of years and how the new system is going to work in Drupal 8. It was a real gas to finally really show it off. People could see we’re not just lying, but it’s actually real.

RR: So, can I ask you, what are you reading now?

MORTEN: What?

RR: Any books, any magazines?

MORTEN: Ah – oh – uh – (bleep) – what’s the name of it? I actually have it on an audio file, it’s a fantasy story about... uh.. a lot of blood, a lot of personal vendettas. Good clean fun. But actually I haven’t had the time to read for a long time because I’ve been doing so much work on the Drupal project and I’ve been moving. Also, I took up my old hobby of painting miniatures again, just to geek out.

I’m a metal-head so pretty much anything... been into a lot of Opeth, a Swedish metal band – kind of a grown man’s metal. (Indecipherable.)

RR: Do you follow anyone on Twitter or FaceBook?

MORTEN: A couple, but normally not. Interviews with musicians are not always the most interesting thing, it’s the same thing as interviews with sports people, “So how did it go today?” “We played really hard!” “On the new album, we’re going to really show off.” So that’s kind of like... a couple of people... there’s a Swedish band called Arch Enemy I’ve been following closely.

RR: What’s the most exciting thing about Drupal 8 for you?

MORTEN: It is the front-end, the Twig system and the templates, and the way we have shifted focus in the front-end completely around, from being an afterthought to a whole new system that is built for front-enders instead of built by back-enders to front-enders. It’s kind of, we’ve taken control over our own destiny, and that I think is going to be the killer app for Drupal 8.

Tags:  DrupalCon DrupalCon Amsterdam Video Video: 

How Drupalers Can Get Organized: Tips From a Librarian

Posted by Promet Source on April 15, 2015 at 5:26pm

Ahh, libraries. The smell of books, the sounds of pages turning, the incessant Karaoke singalongs of the library workers. OK, maybe the last one is a bit far-fetched, but we all know it’s founded in some truth. The fact remains that libraries are a hallowed ground of information consumption and organization.

That organization doesn’t happen by dint of chance. No, there’s a lot of hard work that goes into maintaining a collection, and these steps taken by your local library workers might inspire us to approach our websites with the same set of diligent hands. Get sorting, people!

Pages

Subscribe with RSS Subscribe to Drupal.org aggregator - Planet Drupal