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Thank you for a great Global Training Day

March 3, 2015 at 5:31pm

GTD logoAs many of you know, Global Training Day was this weekend, and it was a great one. We had 29 trainings in 20 countries around the world, showing once again that our community is second to none in passion and enthusiasm.

It's so exciting and humbling to help make GTD a reality. Watching the tweets pour in from around the world is truly awe-inspiring. Here's a selection of a few of our favorites from this year.

For those of you who didn't participate this time around but want to join in next quarter, check our Global Training Day page and sign up to host a training in your community. Again, thank you to everyone who helped make this GTD a reality.

 

 

 

 

Categories: Planet Drupal

Get Ready to Vote: Elections Run 9 March - 20 March

March 2, 2015 at 6:51pm

Huh? What are we Electing?

In case you missed it, the Drupal community electing one candidate to serve a two-year term on the Drupal Association Board of Directors. There are two At-Large (community elected) seats on the Board. The other seat is currently held by Matthew Saunders. We've got a really global slate of candidates to consider, and we encourage you to get to know them by listening to the Meet the Candidates sessions and asking them questions on their candidate profile pages. 

Who can vote?

Voting is open to all individuals who have a Drupal.org account by the time nominations opened and who have logged in at least once in the past year. These individuals' accounts will be added to the voters list on association.drupal.org and they will have access to the voting.

To vote, you will rank candidates in order of your preference (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.). The results will be calculated using an "instant runoff" method. For an accessible explanation of how instant runoff vote tabulation works, see videos linked in this discussion.

Elections process

Voting will be held from 9 March, 2015 through 20 March, 2015. During this period, you can review and comment on candidate profiles on assoc.drupal.org and engage all candidates through posting to the Drupal Association group. We'll also be scheduling and announcing three phone-in all candidates meetings, where community members and candidates can ask questions and get to know each other.

Have questions? Please contact Drupal Association Executive Director Holly Ross. Many thanks to nedjo for pioneering this process and documenting it so well in the past!

Flickr photo: Kodak Views

Categories: Planet Drupal

So long, and thanks for all the fish

March 2, 2015 at 2:52pm

Stephanie El HajjIt is with a happy and heavy heart that I share with you the next step in my journey. After three great years, I am leaving the Drupal Association and packing up my worldly possessions and heading south to Texas, where I will be joining the awesome Austin team of Amazee Labs.

My last three years at the Drupal Association have been incredibly rewarding. I’ve learned so much from each of my (many) DrupalCon teams in Denver, Munich, Sydney, Portland, Prague, Austin, and Amsterdam.

To my Los Angeles and Barcelona teams, I’m sorry to leave you mid-planning, but I’m very excited to see where you take DrupalCon this year without me.

To my DrupalCon globals, thank you for helping grow DrupalCon into what it is today.

To the Portland Drupal community, thank you for being welcoming. Thanks for all the beer and pizza and letting me co-work with you at the Lucky Lab.

To all my volunteers, speakers, sprinters, and trainers, it has been a pleasure to work with you. The community is lucky to have such active, dedicated contributors.

To my colleagues at the Drupal Association, you guys are so weird. Seriously. And I’m going to miss you all dearly.

This may be an end but it’s not THE end. I plan to remain active in the Drupal community, and will be at DrupalCon Los Angeles and DrupalCon Barcelona, as well as MidCamp and possibly LinuxFestNW this year. I hope to see you there!

Cheers,
Stephanie El-Hajj
twitter, drupal.org, irc: stephelhajj
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephelhajj

Categories: Planet Drupal

Drupal Association Board Meeting: 18 February, 2015

February 28, 2015 at 12:17am

February may be the shortest month of the year, but it's certainly been one of the busiest for the Drupal Association, so I apologize for taking more than a week to get this summary post up! What's been keeping us so busy? Our first ever DrupalCon in Latin America and the Drupal Association At-Large Board elections. Both of these events have been huge positive milestones for the Association, and have involved dozens of volunteers from around the globe. In the middle of all that, we managed to sneak in a board meeting on 18 February. If you missed it, you can listen to the recording, read the notes, and peruse the materials. Or feel free to skim this summary!

Operational Update

  • We have a big initiative internally at the Association to reevaluate the metrics we use to illustrate the success of our work. We are also looking at ways to better display these metrics so that you can see more context. So over the next few months, you'll see the metrics in the dashboared shift and change. Just a bit of a heads up, and let us know if you have any feedback along the way.
  • The February board packet covered our January metrics, and things look pretty good one month into the year. We are especially pleased that the Engineering team has been able to bring site performance to our goal levels. 
  • The Engineering Team also took several big steps towards key areas of the Drupal.org roadmap in January. Step 1 of the roadmap is better Account Creation and Login, and several key issues were closed out.
  • The DrupalCon Team and Engineering worked together to launch events.drupal.org in January as well. This shift means that Con sites are all on the same platform now. We no longer have to launch a site from scratch for each Con, which helps make Cons much easier to manage. Most importantly, we've been able to introduce key new features in reegistration for our community. Excited? Go ahead and register now! You can check out the new features yourself!
  • We are really lucky to work with the tireless Drupal 8 Branch Maintainers on the Drupal 8 Accelerate program. The program is picking up steam with a number of grants made and completed already. The next big grant will fund a Drupal CI (testbot) srpint in Portland at the end of March.

Content Strategy Update

Last year, the Content Working Group began a process of building a larger strategy for a reimagination of Drupal.org. Our first work was focused on User Research, and completed that work in the fall, publishing the developed personas. The next phase has focused on developing a content strategy. With over 1.2 MILLION pieces of content on Drupal.org, a strategy for dealing with that content is going to be pretty darn important. You can check out the presentation, as well as the post that's currently one of those pieces of content on Drupal.org.

Drupal.org Advertising Strategy

Finding new revenue streams is vitally important to the Association. For the entire history of the Drupal Association, DrupalCons have been the primary way we have funded other community work. We want to do more to serve our mission: uniting a global open source community to build and promote Drupal. If we're going to do that, we need new revenue streams. The bonus? If we can find new funding sources, it takes the pressure off of DrupalCons to perform financially, which means we can make choices for those events that might not fuel the financial bottom line, but make the events better for the community. 

So how are we doing it? New programs like Drupal Jobs have launched. We are also introducing advertising on Drupal.org and to Drupal.org visitors. We working to develop advertising products that are meaningful for advertisers (enough traffic, good clicks) and also deliver value to our community. We've drawn a few clear lines - we won't advertise on issue queues, for example, and will focus on users who are not logged into the site. We'll also be developing a variety of programs so that small shops can participate alongside bigger firms. 

For all the details, check out the presentation.

The End

Thanks so much for checking in on this board meeting and, as always, please let me know if you have any questions or thoughts.

Categories: Planet Drupal

Let's Meet the Candidates!

February 21, 2015 at 12:44am

Nominations are now closed for the single At-Large seat on the Association Board of Directors. We have an astounding 24 candidates from 14 different countries running for this seat. We are so thrilled that so many of you are so invested in our community that you are taking this step. As with any election, we want to have an informed electorate. So - we invite you to get to know these candidates in a couple of important ways.

Learn about the candidates online. 

Check out the slate of candidates and read what they had to say about their backgrouns and interest in servin gon the board. Each candidate page also features a comments section where you can ask about their plans, hopes, and views for the Association and the project. We only ask that you use this comments section as a place to ask questions, not endorse candidates please. 

Join a Meet the Candidates webcast.

In addition to the candidate profiles, we arfe hosting three live question and answer sessions where you can chime in and hear from the candidates directly. Not all canddiates will be on each call, but don't worry! If you aren't able to connect with a candidate in one of the sessions, we will be recording them, so you can check them out later. Here are the sessions:

Session One
: Tue 24 Feb 2015 at 16:00 UTC

  • 8 AM PST Tue 24 Feb, US and Canada
  • 11 AM EST Tue 24 Feb, US and Canada
  • 1 PM Tue 24 Feb, Sao Paulo Brasil
  • 4 PM Tue 24 Feb, London
  • 12 AM Wed 25 Feb, Beijing
  • 3 AM Wed 25 Feb, Sydney Australia

Join The Meeting

Session Two: Wed 25 Feb 2015 at 00:00 UTC

  • 4 PM PST Wed 25 Feb, US and Canada
  • 7 PM EST Wed 25 Feb, US and Canada
  • 9 PM Wed 25 Feb, Sao Paulo Brasil
  • 1 AM Thu 26 Feb, London
  • 8 AM Thu 26 Feb, Beijing
  • 10 AM Thu 26 Feb, Sydney Australia

Join The Meeting

Session Three: Thu 26 Feb at 20:30 UTC

  • 12:30 PM PST Thu 26 Feb, US and Canada
  • 3:30 PM PST Thu 26 Feb, US and Canada
  • 5:30 PM Thu 26 Feb, Sau Paulo Brasil
  • 8:30 PM Thu 26 Feb, London
  • 4:30 AM Fri 27 Feb, Beijing
  • 7:30 AM Fri 27 Feb, Sydney Australia

Join The Meeting

I hope we'll hear from you during this important part of the elections process. And mark your calendars - voting begins on March 9!

Categories: Planet Drupal

Infographic: Who Attends DrupalCon?

February 2, 2015 at 3:06pm

Did you know that DrupalCon isn’t just for developers? The community survey we conducted at the end of 2014 turned up some interesting facts, including the fascinating statistic that only about half of DrupalCon attendees self-identify as developers? With project managers, C-level executives, and Drupal sales and marketing experts in attendance, DrupalCon is a great place to meet a wide array of passionate Drupal users and advocates.

So, who goes to DrupalCon? Check out the infographic below for a more complete picture of who attends the biggest Drupal conference on earth.

 

Categories: Planet Drupal

Nominations Open for Drupal Association At Large Director

February 1, 2015 at 12:00am

It’s a great time to be part of the Drupal Association. We’ve done some amazing work in the last few years, and we’re in a great position to work with the community to continue to improve and grow fully into our mission. As a Drupal Association At-Large Director, you’d be in the center of the action. The At-large Director position is specifically designed to ensure community representation on the Drupal Association board and we strongly encourage anyone with an interest to nominate themselves today.

Nominate Yourself Today

The Board of Directors of the Drupal Association are responsible for financial oversight and setting the strategic direction of the Drupal Association. New board members will contribute to the strategic direction of the Drupal Association. Board members are advised of, but not responsible for matters related to the day to day operations of the Drupal Association, including program execution, staffing, etc. You can learn more about what’s expected of a board member in this post and presentation.

Directors are expected to contribute around five hours per month and attend three in-person meetings per year (financial assistance is available if required). All board members agree to meet the minimum requirements documented in the board member agreement.

Today we are opening the self-nomination form that allows you to throw your hat in the ring. We're looking to elect one candidate this year to serve a two-year term.

Log in first and...

To nominate yourself, you should be prepared to answer a few questions:

  • About Me: Tell us about yourself! Your background, how you got into Drupal, etc.
  • Motivation: Why are you applying for a board position? What initiatives do you hope to help drive, or what perspectives are you going to try and represent?
  • Experience: What Drupal community contributions have you taken part in (code, camps, etc.)? Do you have experience in financial oversight, developing business strategies, or organization governance?
  • Availability: I am able to travel to three in-person board meetings per year (either self-funded, or with financial sponsorship)
  • IRC Handle
  • Twitter Handle

We will also need to know that you are available for the next step in the process, meet the candidate sessions. We are hosting 2 sessions: 

Session One

  • Tuesday, 24 February 2015 at:
  • 8 AM PST in the US and Canada
  • 11 AM EST in the US and Canada
  • 1 PM in Sao Paulo Brasil
  • 4 PM in London
  • 12 AM Wednesday, 25 February in Beijing
  • 3 AM Wednesday, 25 February Sydney Australia

Session Two

  • Wednesday 25 February 2015 at:
  • 4 PM PST in the US and Canada
  • 7 PM EST in the US and Canada
  • 9 PM in Sao Paulo Brasil
  • 1 AM Thursday, 26 February in London
  • 8 AM Thursday, 26 February in Beijing
  • 10 AM Thursday, 26 February in Sydney Australia

Session Three

  • Thursday 26 February 2015 at:
  • 12:30 PM PST in the US and Canada
  • 3:30 PM EST in the US and Canada
  • 5:30 PM in Sao Paulo Brasil
  • 8:30 AM Friday, 27 February in London
  • 4:30 AM Friday, 27 February in Beijing
  • 7:30 AM Friday, 27 February in Sydney Australia

The nomination form will be open February 1, 2015 through February 20, 2015 at midnight UTC. For a thorough review of the process, please see our announcement blog post.

If you have any questions, please contact Holly Ross, Drupal Association Executive Director.

Flickr photo: Kodak Views

Categories: Planet Drupal

Help us welcome our four new staff members

January 30, 2015 at 9:06pm

The Drupal Association is thrilled to announce the addition of four new staff members. As part of our goal to increase Drupal adoption and provide the community with strong support and advocacy, the organization has been growing at a rapid rate over the past year. Now, we’re welcoming four new staff members into the fold. Please help us say hello to Elise, Lucia, Rachel, and Tim!

Elise Horvath, Operations Team, Operations Coordinator

Elise HElise (EliseH1280) is joining the Operations team as an Operations Coordinator. She will manage key details of the Drupal 8 Accelerate program, will manage the Drupal Store, will assist Operations with any accounting needs, and will assist the board of directors by managing meetings and schedules and taking meeting minutes. Prior to joining the Association, Elise worked in logistics and operations for scrum training services. When not working, Elise enjoys spending time with her fiance, watching movies, cooking and baking, riding her bike, and going to Disney World whenever she has the chance!

Lucia Weinmeister, Revenue Team, Sponsor Fullfillment Coordinator

Lucia WLucia (lweinmeister) is the Association’s new Supporter Fulfillment Coordinator, and will be working with the revenue team to ensure that all our Supporting Partners, Hosting Supporters and Tech Supporters get the most out of their sponsorships. Lucia is one of three Austin, TX-based Association employees, and comes to the Association with a marketing and advertising background. Lucia was born and raised primarily in Mexico City, is fluent in Spanish, and enjoys reading, running, doing Crossfit, cooking, and chasing around her two sons, Bruce and Leon.

Rachel Rivera, Revenue Team, Junior Account Manager

Rachel RRachel (rayn1ta) grew up in the San Francisco area and spent four years living outside the US in Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe. She has worked as a ski instructor, English teacher, and digital marketer. In addition to learning foreign languages, she enjoys yoga, hiking and scuba diving. As a Junior Account Manager with the Drupal Association's revenue team Rachel will focus on identifying and satisfying the needs of awesome Drupal Businesses.

 

Timothy Constien, Community Programs, DrupalCon Sponsor Fullfillment Coordinator

TimTim (timconstien) is joining the Association’s Community Programs team as a DrupalCon Sponsor Fulfillment Coordinator. In this position, he will be ensuring that DrupalCon sponsors enjoy all their benefits and receive top-quality service before, during, and after the convention. Tim is a graduate of Oregon State University, and most recently worked to support the sales and marketing departments at a national radio group based in Portland. In his free time, Tim enjoys exploring: Whether he is finding new pubs to shoot pool at, finding the new best food joint, exploring new tree runs to snowboard through, or road tripping to the next music festival, he is always on the go.

Please help us give a warm welcome to our four new staff members. It’s great to have you on board!

Categories: Planet Drupal

Drupal Association Board Meeting: 21 January 2015

January 28, 2015 at 8:02pm

In the first board meeting of 2015, we hit the pause button and looked back on 2014. With all the numbers in and so many projects completed, we wanted to evaluate our success (and our misses) with the board and with you. We feel really good about what we accomplished with the rest of the community. To me, it's doubly impressive because the Association spent so much of last year growing like crazy. We started the year with just about 13 staff and ended the year with 27. We're still small, but doubling your staff is never an easy endeavor. So to go through that kind of change, and to also get some much other good stuff done seems pretty remarkable to me. As always, you can check out the notes, the materials, and the recording, or peruse my summary of the meeting here.


Operational update


I think I can safely say that the theme of 2014 was “Let’s see what we learn from this!” We started the year with a Leadership Plan that outlined some important goals and strategies. We also defined key metrics we would track to help us understand if we were making progress on those goals. This was the first time the organization had this kind of framework to not only get a lot of stuff done, but to understand if that stuff was fulfilling its purpose.

The plan helped us identify lots of things to experiment with, and throughout the year we learned a lot about our plan itself. Metrics didn’t always point to the outcomes we thought they did. Some goals that we set were impossible to meet because of outside influences. But having the plan - that was important. It forced us to think about our work before, during, and after every project. So where did all our experiments take us? A lot of places. Here is a short, incomplete, and grossly over-simplified list of what we accomplished in 2014:

  • We set the proper frame. We developed a vision statement, revamped the mission statement, and created a values statement for the Association.
  • We rebranded, developing new logos for the Association and our programs that reflect our maturity as an organization.
  • We diversified our revenue, by a lot. Introducing new programs and services we were able to make a dent in the ration of Con related revenue to non-Con revenue. This is important for the financial health of the Association, but also because if Cons are our primary source of revenue, we can’t innovate and evolve them with as much courage for fear of undermining our total revenue.
  • Speaking of DrupalCons, we held two really big ones. Lots of things went right - they are well run, with great speakers and great community. We also collected a lot of data about the Cons and identified lots of places to work on for 2015 and beyond. (We promise we heard you about the food in Amsterdam!)
  • The marketing team is creating lots of technical marketing and other branded content that is starting to get great traction in the field. Resources like “Managing Media in Drupal” allow us to showcase the best that Drupal has to offer, regardless of version.
  • The launch of Drupal Jobs was a big milestone for us. We had not launched a product before, and were thrilled to get something out there that the community has repeatedly asked for. It’s still new, and we’re still learning, but we are overall very excited about the steady growth that we have seen.
  • Testbots is an area I have heard about on a weekly basis since I started at the Association. In 2014 we were able to forge a great partnership with the testbot volunteers. The Association is now managing the ongoing operation of the existing testbot infrastructure while the volunteers get to work on the next generation. We’ve seen massive improvements in performance as a result - wait times have dropped from almost 120 minutes to about 20 minutes on average. During the recent Global Sprint Weekend, we went from our usual 4 AWS instances to 20!
  • Drupal.org profiles have also seen a tremendous change in 2014. Again, thanks to the work of some amazing volunteers, we were able to introduce small targeted changes frequently, beginning with profile pictures. The work is not done and there are more changes to come, but profiles are becoming better and better online resumes and community connectors for the community.
  • We managed to be our projected deficit spend for the year. This sets us up well for 2015

I would like to point out that I am extremely proud of the Association staff who endured a lot of growing pains while churning out really good, quality work. In addition to being awesome at what they do, they are hilarious and smart. I owe the a huge debt of gratitude. HOWEVER, all of the bullet points above represent a significant contribution from the volunteers in the community as well. We don’t do our work alone, and we are so grateful to the hundreds of you who have prototyped, tested, coded, documented, trained, mentored, and made puns. Your leadership in the community is noticed and appreciated. Our greatest hope is that we are making your Drupal life a little better.

Marketing Team 2015 Update

The marketing team built a very solid base in 2014 and is prepared to declare 2015 the year of content. Here are a few key initiatives that you can expect this year:

  • More branded content, better presentation. We’re going to turn Drupal.org into the best site out there to discover all you can do with Drupal. We’re currently developing a content strategy that will help us discover all the great content that already exists, but gets lost in the one million+ nodes on the site. Then we can combine that with the great technical content we are also crafting to create more resource centers covering everything from media to search in Drupal.
  • A Drupal.org blog. We are in the middle of a content strategy process led by staff with the Content Working Group and Forum One Communications. It’s clear that we need a better channel to expose the folks who want Drupal news, but who aren’t ready to drink from the firehose that is Drupal Planet. The blog will allow us to reach those folks, and we hope we can use it to highlight the best writing about Drupal that is already being produced.
  • Drupal newsletter. In 2008, we stopped sending a regular Drupal newsletter to the tens of thousands of subscribers on Drupal.org. We’re bringing that back in 2015, with a model similar to that of the blog - the best community content. This newsletter will differ from the Association newsletter in that all the content will be focused on Drupal itself.
  • A challenge will be localization - translating content for our global audience. With the release of Drupal 8 nearing, and its emphasis on localization, we want to meet this need. We’ll be working on strategies to make translation happen on key content.

Of course, there is more to the update than this summary, so I encourage you to check out the presentation.

And then we ran out of time

We were also scheduled to vote on a slate of candidates for the newly formed Licensing Working Group. Unfortunately, we ran out of time. The Executive Committee of the board will be discussing next week to see if we can vote electronically on this topic.

Thanks for a great 2014. Here’s to an even better 2015

Again, thank you for the support, the work, the encouragement, the ideas, and even the complaints. All of it makes us better as an organization, and we hope that when we’re better, Drupal is better. 


 

Flickr Photo: DianaConnolly101

Categories: Planet Drupal

Drupal.org team week notes #31: 2014 in review

January 25, 2015 at 12:24pm

Now that we are few weeks into 2015, we’d like to look back at 2014 and share some interesting numbers about Drupal.org.

Audience

Last year Drupal.org received almost 48.9 million visits from 21.2 million unique visitors. The spike around September/October is due to spam-related traffic, and, of course, DrupalCon Amsterdam.

Users

152,200 users logged in to Drupal.org at least once during the year. Out of those, 31,466 users performed at least one activity on the site, such as commented, created a node or committed code.

More than 21,500 people left a comment or more in the issue queues. More than 4,000 people commented in the Drupal core issue queue.

Commits

Overall 145,907 commits happened on Drupal.org, with more than 4,000 commits to Drupal core specifically.

More than 3,200 people committed code to contributed projects (not counting Drupal core), with an average of 37.43 commits per user.

More than 1,400 people got commit mention in Drupal core patches.

Comments & Issues

Our users left 569,217 comments, 94% of them were comments in the issue queues. 30% of all comments in the issue queues happened in Drupal core queue.

On average there were 22.4 comments per user, with 38.74 comments per user in the Drupal core issue queue.

Our users created 78,505 issues, with an average of 4.55 issues per user.

5,192 contributed projects were created on Drupal.org in 2014. 31% of those are sandbox projects.

Infrastructure

On the infrastructure side our uptime was 99.97% over 12 months, and the average full page load time for the year is 3.64 across Drupal.org. It improved throughout the year; we are down to 3.08 as an average for December. Our time to first byte response was 1,374ms in January; we are down to 441ms for December.


Drupal.org testbots tested over 33,300 patches. An average test queue and test duration times for Drupal 8 core were about 35 minutes each.

Support

On support front 82% of issues in Drupal.org-related issue queues got a response within 48 hours after being created.

An average response time (time between an issue was created and first comment not by issue author) across all issue queues on Drupal.org was 82.87 hours. For Drupal core issue queue this number was 60.68 hours. For Drupal.org related queues 34.19 hours.

* * *

Full stats you can find in the 2014 stats spreadsheet.

Compared to 2013 some of the user activity numbers go down, which is directly related to the phase of the Drupal release cycle. Right after Drupal 7 release user activity peaked and then was slowly going down as Drupal 7 and contrib ecosystem matured. We are looking forward to Drupal 8 release! In the recent Drupal Association community survey about 80% of respondents said they have firm plans to adopt Drupal 8, suggesting that release will cause a huge boost in user activity on Drupal.org.

2014 was a great year, and thank you for spending some part of it on Drupal.org! We are excited to see what 2015 will bring.

Categories: Planet Drupal

India – Embracing a Contribution Culture

January 23, 2015 at 8:25pm

DrupalCamp DelhiWhile we know there are over 33,000 Drupal developers around the globe, I had no idea how strong Drupal was in India until I was there with Rachel Friesen, scouting locations for a possible DrupaCon Asia. By meeting with the community at camps, meetups, and dinners, we saw first hand how strongly India is innovating with Drupal and contributing back to the Project.

When it comes to geographic referrals, India is second in driving traffic to Drupal.org. However, they aren’t second in contributions, but things are changing. I was especially impressed with the relationship between Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) and Pfizer, a $51.5B life sciences company. Pfizer allows TCS to contribute their code, which is often not allowed for legal reasons. Since contributing back is a one of Pfizer’s top values, they asked TCS to make contribution part of their culture - and they did. At TCS, Rachit Gupta has created contribution programs that teach staff how to contribute and gives them time during work hours each week to contribute code. With a staff of several hundred developers, this can make TCS become a mighty contribution engine for the Project.

I’m equally impressed by other Indian web development consulting agencies that I met like Axelerant, Blisstering Solutions, Kellton Tech, and Srijan, who also have a contribution culture in their organizations. They even set up KPIs around staff contributions to make sure they are keeping this initiative top of mind.

While in India, many pointed out to me how the country has grown as a nation -- and, in its own way, Drupal has a hand in the country’s prosperity. Shine.com, a Drupal job search site, shows there are over 15,000 Drupal jobs in India.  All of the companies I talked to are growing their teams to meet that demand. Imagine if this contribution culture is fully embraced by Indian web development companies? The impact on the Project will be significant.

Individuals are also stepping up to support the Project and there is a passion for contribution that is spreading. I keynoted DrupalCamp Delhi, where over 1,000 people registered and 575 people attended. I saw first hand how dedicated the organizers were to make the event informative and fun. Several sprint mentors were on hand to lead more than 75 people through a full day sprint. Plus, the following weekend was Global Sprint Weekend and sprints popped up all over India in Bangalore, Chennai, Delhi, Goa, Hyderabad and Pune.

Not only are Drupalers in India helping the Project, but they are also using Drupal to create change in India with leapfrog solutions that give Indians access to more digital services. For example, many villages don’t have access to products found in major cities due to lack of infrastructure. The village stores simply can’t scale to buy and hold large quantities of inventory.

Iksula, an Indian eRetail consulting agency,  created a headless Drupal solution for Big Bazaar, India’s largest hypermarket, which provides lightweight tablets for store owners throughout India. Using those tablets, villagers can go into their local store and buy their goods online. The products are delivered to the shop owner, who hand delivers products to the consumer, giving people easier access to goods that can improve their quality of life.

As another example, we can look at IIT Bombay, India’s top engineering university, which uses Drupal at the departmental level. Professors P Sunthar and Kannan are taking Drupal to the masses by creating a MOOC in conjunction with MIT’s EDx. The work is funded by a government initiative called FOSSEE (Free and Open Source Software for Education), and through it, Indian university students can watch videos on several open source technologies, including Drupal.

The initiative bridges learning divides by providing the trainings in several languages found throughout India and provides low cost tablets for students who do not have a personal computer. This well thought-out program can help students learn the tools faster to meet the needs of of future employers. 

India has clearly embraced Drupal. They are making innovative solutions with the software and they are learning to contribute that back to the Project. Its for these reasons we want to host DrupalCon Asia. It will be a chance to highlight India’s Drupal talent and accelerate their adoption of a contribution culture.

A huge thank you to Chakrapani R, Hussain Abbas, Rahul Dewal, Jacob Singh, Mayank Chadha, Parth Gohil, Ankur Gupta, Piyush Poddar, Karanjit Singh, Mahesh Bukka, Vishal Singhal, Ani Gupta, Rachit Gupta, Sunit Gala, Professor P Sunthar and all the other community members who helped organize our trip to India. I’m personally moved and professionally inspired by all that you do.

Image credit to DrupalCamp Delhi

Categories: Planet Drupal

Drupal.org 2015 Advertising Initiatives

January 22, 2015 at 10:49pm

I was hired by the Drupal Association in October 2014 to develop a new revenue stream from advertising on Drupal.org. For some time we’ve been trying to diversify revenue streams away from DrupalCon, both to make the Association more sustainable and to ensure that DrupalCons can serve community needs, not just our funding needs. We’ve introduced the Drupal Jobs program already and now, after conversations with the community, we want to put more work into Drupal.org advertising initiatives.

This new revenue stream will help fund various Drupal.org initiatives and improvements including better account creation and login, organization and user profile improvements, a responsive redesign of Drupal.org, issue workflow and Git improvements, making Drupal.org search usable, improving tools to find and select projects, and the Groups migration to Drupal 7.

We spent time interviewing members of the Drupal Association board, representatives of the Drupal Community, Working Groups, Supporting Partners, and Drupal Businesses, both large and small to help develop our strategy and guidelines. Our biggest takeaways are:

  • Advertising should not only appeal to advertisers, but also be helpful to our users and/or our mission.
  • When possible, only monetize users who are logged out and not contributing to the Project. If you’re on Drupal.org to do work and contribute, we don’t want you to see ads.
  • Don’t clutter the site, interfere with navigation or disrupt visitors, especially contributors.
  • Do not put ads on pages where users are coming to work, like the issue queue.
  • Advertising products should be inclusive, with low cost options and tiered pricing. We want to make sure that small businesses without huge marketing budgets have the opportunity to get in front of the Drupal Community.
  • Create high impact opportunities for Partners that already support the Community.
  • Address the industry-wide shift to Programmatic Advertising, which is the automated buying and selling of digital advertising.

There are already advertising banners on Drupal.org, however we need to expand their reach to hit our goals. We’re trying to address challenges for our current advertisers, including a relatively low amount of views on pages with ads, which makes it difficult for them to reach their goals.

We’re also facing industry-wide challenges in Digital Advertising. Advertisers are looking for larger, more intrusive ads that get the users’ attention, or at the very least use standard Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) ad sizes, which are larger than the ads we offer on Drupal.org.

We came up with a new line of products that we feel will help us reach our goals, but not disrupt the Drupal.org experience, or the Drupal Association Engineering Team roadmap. We want our Engineering Team to fix search on Drupal.org, not spend time developing and supporting major advertising platforms.

2015 Advertising Initiatives:

  • The ongoing development of curated content with banner ads including resource guides, content by industry and in the future, blog posts.
  • Continued display of banner ads on high profile pages like the Homepage, Marketplace and Case Studies Section.
  • Sponsored listings from Supporting Technology Partners (similar to Hosting Listings).
  • Opt-in email subscriptions with special offers from our Supporters.
  • Audience Extension: a secure, anonymous, non-interruptive way to advertise to Drupal.org visitors. It allows advertisers to programmatically reach the Drupal.org audience while on other websites through Ad Networks and Exchanges.

I wanted to spend most of my time explaining Audience Extension, since its unlike anything we’ve done in the past, and it may prompt questions. This product makes sense because it addresses all of the challenges we’re facing:

  • It’s affordable for small businesses; they can spend as little as $200 on a campaign
  • We don’t need to flood the site with ads and disrupt the user experience.
  • It’s relatively easy to implement - we won’t interrupt the engineering team or their efforts to improve Drupal.org.
  • We will only target anonymous (logged out) users.
  • We will support “Do Not Track” browser requests.
  • This is an industry-wide standard that we’re adopting.
  • Anonymous users will have the option to opt-out.
  • This improves the ad experience on other sites with more relevant, useful ads that also support the community.

How does Audience Extension Work?

We’re partnering with Perfect Audience, a company that specializes in retargeting, and offers a unique audience extension solution called Partner Connect.  We add a Perfect Audience JavaScript tag to the Drupal.org source code. This tag will be loaded on the page to logged out users. The tag places a Perfect Audience cookie in the visitor's browser that indicates that they recently visited Drupal.org. Once that cookie is in place, an advertiser looking to reach out to the Drupal.org community can advertise to those visitors on Facebook, Google's ad network, and many other sites that participate in major online ad networks. Advertisers create and manage these campaigns through their Perfect Audience accounts. They pay for the ads through Perfect Audience and we split the revenue with Perfect Audience and the ad networks that serve the ads.

  • The program is anonymous. No personally identifiable information (such as email address, name or date of birth) is gathered or stored.
  • No data is sold or exchanged, this merely gives advertisers the opportunity to buy a banner ad impression within the Perfect Audience platform.
  • It's easy to opt-out. You can just click over to the Perfect Audience privacy page and click two buttons to opt out of the tracking. Here's the link.
  • Drupal.org will support “Do Not Track” browser requests and only users who have not logged in (anonymous) will be included in the program.
  • It does not conflict with EU privacy rulings. Advertiser campaigns for Partner Connect can only be geotargeted to the United States and Canada right now.
  • Only high quality, relevant advertisers who have been vetted by an actual human will be able to participate in this program. Some good examples of Perfect Audience advertisers would be companies like New Relic and Heroku.
  • Perfect Audience is actually run by a Drupaler! The first business started by founder Brad Flora back in 2008 was built on Drupal. He spent countless hours in the IRC channel talking Drupal and posting in the forums. He understands how important it is to keep sensitive pages on Drupal.org an ad-free experience and he’s very excited to be able to help make that happen.
  • This program has the potential to generate significant revenue for the Drupal Association and Project over time as more advertisers come on board.


It’s important that we fund Drupal.org improvements, and that we do so in a responsible way that respects the community. We anticipate rolling out these new products throughout the year, starting with Audience Extension on February 5th.  Thanks for taking the time to read about our initiatives, and please tell us your thoughts!

Personal blog tags: advertisingdrupal.org
Categories: Planet Drupal

A Few Things to Unwrap on Drupal's Birthday

January 15, 2015 at 1:07pm

Happy birthday to Drupal! On this day in 2001, Drupal 1.0 was released.

This milestone is the perfect time to talk about some of the findings of our recent community survey. The survey findings offer a window into what community members are thinking as the project matures and evolves. It also gives us at the Drupal Association a way to better understand what we're doing right and what we could be doing better. There aren't many surprises (and that's a good thing), but all of the findings are educational. Here are three results we thought were particularly interesting and insightful.

Drupal 8 Will Be Broadly Adopted


In the survey, about 80% of respondents said they either plan to start using Drupal 8 as soon as it is released, or plan to adopt it at some point after release. Another 8% said they did not have specific plans to adopt, but do plan to evaluate Drupal 8.

 

drupal8adoption

 

 

Drupal.org Remains an Important and Heavily-Used Tool


The overwhelming majority of respondents said they use Drupal.org more than once per week. Most also say they are satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the site. While that result is encouraging, it does not change the important mission to improve the experience of the site and make it a better tool for everyone from first time visitors to those who spend the majority of their working time on the site.

 

 

dosatisfaction

 

 

We Need to Create Broader Awareness of Drupal Association Programs


Community members who took the survey have great awareness of DrupalCons. Awareness of the work we are doing on Drupal.org seems to be steadily growing. But awareness is relatively low for Community Grants and our Supporter Programs that provide a way for organizations to give back to the Project. That awareness is clearly something we need to improve to promote transparency.

 

 

awareness

 

 

If you would like to read the full results, you can access them here (2.8M PDF). Thanks for reading, and thanks for being a part of this amazing community.

 

Categories: Planet Drupal

Get Ready for the 2015 Community Elections

January 6, 2015 at 4:31am

Update: Elections are now open!

Nominate Yourself Today

During the holidays I met some folks who used to work at other open source projects. One of them asked me, "What's your favorite part of your job?" Lucky for me, I have a lot of great things to choose from, but the thing that always stands out is the global nature of our community. All the customs, cultures, and values are tough to navigate, but I love learning about the variety of perspectives you all bring to the table. I sincerely believe that this diversity of experience makes our community that much stronger.

That diversity is also why we have two At-Large positions on the Association Board of Directors - positions that are self-nominated and elected by the community. Simply put, the At-large Director position is specifically designed to ensure community representation on the Drupal Association board. If you are interested in helping shape the future of the Drupal Association, we encourage you to read this post and be prepared to nominate yourself between 1 February and 20 February, 2015.

How Do Nominations and Elections Work?

Specifics of the election mechanics were decided through a community-based process in 2012 with participation by dozens of Drupal community members. More details can be found in the proposal that was approved by the Drupal Association board in 2012 and adapted for use this year.

What Does the Drupal Association Board Do?

The Board of Directors of the Drupal Association are responsible for financial oversight and setting the strategic direction of the Drupal Association. New board members will contribute to the strategic direction of the Drupal Association. Board members are advised of, but not responsible for matters related to the day to day operations of the Drupal Association, including program execution, staffing, etc.

Directors are expected to contribute around five hours per month and attend three in-person meetings per year (financial assistance is available if required). You can learn more about what’s expected of board members by reviewing the board member agreement. You can also check out the presentation and summary we shared this summer.

Who can run?

There are no restrictions on who can run, and you don't need anyone to nominate you.

What will I need to do during the elections?

During the elections, members of the Drupal community will ask questions of candidates. They'll post comments on candidate profiles here on assoc.drupal.org and to the public Drupal Association group at http://groups.drupal.org/drupal-association. We'll also organize three all-candidates meetings (which will be announced on the Drupal Association group and blog), where community members and candidates will be able to ask questions and share information. The more you can participate, the more Drupal community members will be able to find out what you would bring to the Drupal Association board.

How Do I Run?

Candidates needed! If you are considering running, please read the entirety of this post, and then be prepared to complete a self-nomination form. This form will be open on 1 February, 2015 through 20 February, 2015 at midnight UTC. You'll be asked for some information about yourself and your interest in the Drupal Association Board. When the nominations close, your candidate profile will be published and available for Drupal community members to browse. Comments will be enabled, so please monitor your candidate profile so you can respond to questions from community members.

Who can vote?

Voting is open to all individuals who have a Drupal.org account by the time nominations open and who have logged in at least once in the past year. These individuals' accounts will be added to the voters list on association.drupal.org and they will have access to the voting.

To vote, you will rank candidates in order of your preference (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.). The results will be calculated using an "instant runoff" method. For an accessible explanation of how instant runoff vote tabulation works, see videos linked in this discussion.

Elections process

Voting will be held from 9 March, 2015 through 20 March, 2015. During this period, you can review and comment on candidate profiles on assoc.drupal.org and engage all candidates through posting to the Drupal Association group. We'll also be scheduling and announcing three phone-in all candidates meetings, where community members and candidates can ask questions and get to know each other.

Have questions? Please contact Drupal Association Executive Director Holly Ross. Many thanks to nedjo for pioneering this process and documenting it so well last year!

Flickr photo: Kodak Views

Categories: Planet Drupal

Using Personas in the Community

December 23, 2014 at 7:26pm

This post is part of an ongoing series detailing the new personas that have been drawn up as part of our Drupal.org user research.

Now that we’ve seen real representatives of our Drupal.org user personas, you may be thinking, “these personas are pretty cool, but I’m not sure how they affect me."

Beyond just the obvious applications towards redesigning Drupal.org, any member of our community can use the Drupal.org personas to build better Drupal training programs, tutorials, and Drupal events.

Cathy Theys

Improving Drupal Training

Cathy Theys is a prominent community member who is known for the hard work she puts in to facilitating Drupal training and sprints all around the world. Some of the problems Cathy has consistently seen revolve around language, and the Drupal.org user personas give a starting point for building more friendly wordage in the community.

"I think that re-using these personas at events can help people identify with whether or not they’re supposed to be in a certain sprint, or which part of that sprint they’re supposed to be in,” Cathy said. “For example, at DrupalCons on Friday, our attendance is probably around 450-500. A great deal of what the mentors do is try and figure out when people are walking through the door, where they should sit down and what they should do.

“In Amsterdam we had some signs identifying the three sprint locations— one of them was the main sprint with topic areas, another was a workshop that showed people the absolute basics — how to use the issue queue and interact with the community— and then there was a sprint that was halfway in-between for people who are set up, who have the tools, but maybe aren’t comfortable working on a sprint issue. That’s the mentored sprint area.

One of the things we planned in advance of DrupalCon Amsterdam was the wording to put on the signs. We wanted to figure out, how does someone identify if that’s the right room for them and if not, what is?"

And when it comes to the personas, Cathy sees the value. “These personas have information that relates to each persona’s amount of contribution and engagement with the community. I can see how that could help out."

Bettering the Issue Queue

GaborGábor Hojtsy is another well-known person in the Drupal community, and is currently working as the Multilingual team lead. Like Cathy, he sees the potential for using personas to help build the Drupal community.

"I think it would be good to verify that Drupal.org serves these personas. I think that... in a lot of areas in Drupal.org, we serve the Experts and the Masters very well and we don’t serve the rest too well — especially Newcomers. What we do in the Drupal community well is to bring in the Newcomers at events, but we don’t do a good job of bringing in the Newcomers on the site. There’s a lot of text, a lot of things left out of date, a lot of contradicting information — so there’s a lot of space to move downward on this pyramid to serve those people,” he said.

Both Cathy and Gábor recognized how the language can help facilitate improvements to the Drupal project as well — namely, in the issue queues. For Cathy, this often arises when talking to experts in other industries who come in to the Drupal sprints as Learners.

“Right now there is a wording problem, and I think a lot of it revolves around this word novice and how it is misunderstood,” said Cathy. “Sometimes there is an issue in the queue where... for example, a patch is pretty good, but it’s using a deprecated method. So someone has to go find the lines that use the deprecated call and change it to do the newer, better way instead.

"For someone who is an expert at PHP they might feel a little insulted, because they view the task as so easy-- but it lets them focus on learning the actual Drupal contribution workflow. The task itself is simple so that it clears your mind to focus on the things that are new and hard, which are the contribution parts. But if you don’t explain why you’re asking this expert in PHP to do what they might see as menial task, they are insulted and stop contributing."

Gábor has seen the other side of that particular problem.

“People assume if an issue is critical or major, that it would be for Masters only, so they may not even touch that one — but it’s not necessarily true. It would be certainly good to improve the issue queue system to identify better issues for Newcomers and Learners. It’s a lot more difficult, though, because there’s always some sort of domain knowledge required — so the target is not just Skilled in general but Skilled in a specific set of things."

Building Better DrupalCons

When it comes to the biggest Drupal events of all, you can bet that the personas will be used by the planning team.

Rachel F“We're at the initial phase of incorporating the personas,” said the Association’s Events Manager, Rachel Friesen. “One way we’ve interpreted the Drupal Association’s goal of "Grow the Community" as it relates to DrupalCon is the idea that we need to bring more Learners to DrupalCon. Specifically, we want them to find DrupalCon accessible, which is why we're trying to find new ways to reach out to welcome first time attendees.

“Another Drupal Association goal is to "Accelerate the Project,” and we’ve interpreted that DrupalCon’s role in that is by helping increase the number of contributions that are made to the project. To help foster that, we plan to make it easier for our attendees to transition from Learner to Skilled. Part of that means that we need to not only increase number of first time DrupalCon participants, but also remove barriers for new Drupalers to fit in at DrupalCon, make friends, and feel at home in our community.”

Steph El-Hajj“We’ve been talking about ways to apply these personas,” said Stephanie El-Hajj, the Program Coordinator for the Drupal Association. “Ideally, we bring in Learners, and then they’re tutored and mentored by Experts and Masters. We are seriously looking at using training, summits, sessions and BOFs to move DrupalCon attendees from Learners to Skilled, and using mentoring and sprints to move people from Skilled to Expert and Master.

“Mentoring and giving back via sprints helps people move through the Drupal learning curve,” Stephanie continued, “with sprinting you’re learning how to do stuff hands on, rather than just looking up an answer or being told how to do something, and you’re applying concepts to projects you maybe didn’t tackle at work. It’s that kind of contributing that helps you grow. And if you have a mentor cheering you on, that’s even better.”

Putting the 'Person' in Persona

Ultimately, user personas are not about Drupal, but are about people: specifically, about helping them learn and grow in the Drupal world.

"I’ve had a lot of different jobs in my life,” said Cathy. "I’ve had a university instructor job, I’ve been a dog trainer, I’ve been a breastfeeding counselor, and all of these different things — and this job that I have right now — involves trying to teach people in a way that respects them for what they already know. The way that you explain things to people is so important to get buy-in and make them feel respected and useful at the same time. So it’s not Drupal specific — it’s all about the humans."

Personal blog tags: drupal.org user researchpersona interviews
Categories: Planet Drupal